Keeping Water Hose & House pipes from freezing in winter

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by KCsmiling, Oct 11, 2016.

  1. KCsmiling

    KCsmiling New Egg

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    Hello,

    This is our first year raising ducks. I have a few questions:

    1. How do we keep our house's water pipes from freezing this winter, since we are using the hose connected to the house to refill the ducks pool???
    Also, any more economical ways to keep the hose from freezing? our coop is about 100 feet from the house, so a heated hose would be expensive.
    thanks so much!
    Kristin
     
  2. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I do not know exactly how your hose connection on your house is positioned and exposed to the weather. There are spacial type of valves called frost proof that allow the shut of portion to be inside your home. Here is a link from Amazon. You can purchase these at most home centers. https://www.amazon.com/Prier-P-164D...&sr=8-7&keywords=frost+free+garden+hose+valve
    After you fill whatever container/pond in your outdoors, disconnect hose and drain water out of hose. Your hose will be empty at that stage and ready to be used next time needed.
    Wishing you Best. Ask anything else you need to know. [​IMG]
     
  3. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    I do not use my hose in the winter...I carry water to the Chickens once a day and I carry water three times a day to the Ducks...5 Gallon pails...Safest way to water in the winter....

    Cheers!
     
  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Chicken Obsessed

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    KC, it would be helpful if you put your general location in your profile. There is no way I could keep a hose functional in the winter. Even if I only hooked it up when I needed to use it (150' or so) It would be so stiff by the time I got it attached to the sill cock, the hose would be so stiff it would crack. Then, removing it, it would be impossible to coil up. However, if you are in a warmer climate, and mid day gets above freezing, you might be able to attach your hose and use it, then put it away again. Of course any water left in the hose will sink to the bottom of a coil and possibly split the hose if/when it freezes.
     
  5. KCsmiling

    KCsmiling New Egg

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    Thanks so much!
     
  6. KCsmiling

    KCsmiling New Egg

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    May 24, 2016
    Thanks!
     
  7. KCsmiling

    KCsmiling New Egg

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    May 24, 2016
    Sorry for the missing info. We are in Michigan - freezing temps in winter.
    Thanks!
     
  8. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

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    I carried water to my flock for years in Michigan winters, 150 ft., 35 or so birds. NO MORE! Last year we rented a trencher and buried a water line to a frost free hydrant at the coop. Wonderful! Now I carry water about ten feet, so much easier. It was a one-time project, well worth the effort. With a few birds, it's not as big a deal, BUT how will you keep the water from freezing? Is the coop electrified? Otherwise, plan on taking fresh water out two or three times daily. Mary
     
  9. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Chicken Obsessed

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    [​IMG] For you!!!!
     
  10. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    I use a hose in winter sometimes, and I am careful to disconnect it from the faucet and to drain it thoroughly after use. Do those two things and you shouldn't have any problem.

    However, there will be days when it's so bloody freezing that I will just forget the hose and hand carry an iron pot of hot water from the house when I need water to clean the coops.

    Oh, how I'm not looking forward to winter.

    You must have a stock tank heater for your duck pond though, right? Or else your web-footed darlings will have pretty "thick" water by late morning on those single digit days.
     

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