Looking for a bird

Sonoma

Hatching
Jan 12, 2020
1
0
2
I'm Sonoma looking for a free parrot or cockatiel my daughter wants one I'm located in Waycross Georgia I'm looking for someone who has a bird and can deliver to my home I don't own a car
 

ValerieJ

Enabler
Premium member
Jul 24, 2016
7,610
43,658
1,147
Washington State
Hi! :frow Welcome to BYC! You are in the New Members Forum.

You might find something in the Buy, Sell, Trade Forum. Maybe this one: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forums/other-poultry-birds-hatching-eggs.34/ or in the Caged Birds thread here: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forums/caged-birds-parrots-canaries-finches-etc.57/ or you might start a thread in the Animals in Need of a Free Home thread here: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forums/animals-in-need-of-free-re-homing.16182/

Good luck! I hope you find a nice bird for your daughter.
 

ChickenCanoe

Crossing the Road
9 Years
Nov 23, 2010
29,380
19,084
867
St. Louis, MO
There are parrot rescue groups all over the world. There are at least 4 in GA. There is likely to be one close to you.
The chances of finding a free one that someone would be willing to deliver to you are slim and none. If they would be willing to do so, they would require you have proper housing. What are the dimensions of the cage it would be kept in? Do you have an area outside the cage for recreation and play time? They will need that daily, not occasionally. If you don't do that, you are a parrot abuser, not a rescuer.
Do you know anything about keeping parrots?
Properly keeping most parrots requires at least one huge cage which can be $1000 or more. Can you do that?
Can you commit to keeping a bird with the constant care it needs for 50 or more years?
If you can't commit to that long term care, forget it.
The reason there are so may rescue groups is that so few people know how to properly care for them and they then give them up. Every time they lose their home, they become more psychotic. They will need a professional behavior consultant (about $125 per hour) in order to get over their psychoses. Some can't be fixed.
I worked at a macaw breeding and rescue program in the tropics with over 400 Scarlet and Great Green Macaws. Many were rescues from homes and makeshift zoos as well as many bred there for eventual release into the wild. We had several rescues that would attack any human they could reach. We had one that would pluck every feather on its body. You never want to be bitten by a parrot.
Getting a rescue parrot presents many more problems. The reason is that most people aren't prepared for that long term care. Most parrots mate for life. If it is a single parrot, you are their mate - for life, likely longer than your daughter will life. They go crazy if they are rehomed. My associates and friends have affiliations with several rescue groups.
People really shouldn't own these majestic birds. Most people aren't willing to give them the size housing they need and are unwilling to spend the time with them they need, every day of their life. Then they will outlive a human and then outlive their children. We had a breeding pair of scarlets that were over 90 years old.
All of my aforementioned cautionary tales, don't mention food and vet care. Most good avian vets charge about $250 per visit. Can you do that?
 
Last edited:

007Sean

Pheasant Whisperer
Staff member
Premium member
Oct 25, 2015
28,351
165,006
1,612
South Central Texas
There are parrot rescue groups all over the world. There are at least 4 in GA. There is likely to be one close to you.
The chances of finding a free one that someone would be willing to deliver to you are slim and none. If they would be willing to do so, they would require you have proper housing. What are the dimensions of the cage it would be kept in? Do you have an area outside the cage for recreation and play time?
Do you know anything about keeping parrots?
Properly keeping most parrots requires at least one huge cage which can be $1000 or more. Can you do that?
Can you commit to keeping a bird with the constant care it needs for 50 or more years?
If you can't commit to that long term care, forget it.
The reason there are so may rescue groups is that so few people know how to properly care for them and give them up. Every time they lose their home, they become more psychotic. They will need a professional behavior consultant (about $125 per hour) in order to get over their psychoses. Some can't be fixed. We had several rescues that would attack any human they could reach. We had one that would pluck every feather on its body.
Getting a rescue parrot presents many more problems. The reason is that most people aren't prepared for that long term care. Most parrots mate for life. If it is a single parrot, you are their mate. They go crazy if they are rehomed. I'm affiliated with several rescue groups. I worked at a macaw breeding and rescue program in the tropics with over 400 Scarlet and Great Green Macaws. Many were rescues from homes and makeshift zoos as well as many bred there for eventual release into the wild.
People really shouldn't own these majestic birds. Most people aren't willing to give them the size housing they need and are unwilling to spend the time with them they need, every day of their life. Then they will outlive a human and then outlive their children. We had a breeding pair of scarlets that were over 90 years old.
Excellent response! :thumbsup
 
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