Lots of Goat Inquiries :)

Livia Stouffer

Chirping
Jul 8, 2020
73
87
53
Petal, Mississippi
Highly suggest as a side note that you join BYC's sister site called BackYard Herds. When we had goats I found so much great help there!
I'm already on there! I posted the extact same thing over there around the same time and still haven't gotten any feedback whatsoever. It's kinda disapointing, but it's still nice to read through someone elses and learn through them!
 

Callender Girl

Crowing
Sep 18, 2018
1,638
8,555
486
North Central Iowa
I'm glad you enjoyed your visit -- how can anyone NOT like spending time with beautiful goats?

In my experience, goats -- like dogs -- make the best pets when they've been socialized as babies. Bottle babies are a lot of work, but it's quite possible to get weaned kids who are still young enough to bond well with you but don't require nearly as much effort on your part.
 

Callender Girl

Crowing
Sep 18, 2018
1,638
8,555
486
North Central Iowa
If any of my posts seem to be unfinished or otherwise wonky, my laptop is on its last leg and I am awaiting a replacement.

So, as I was going to say before my computer refused to cooperate, is that I think it's a good idea to shop around and look at other sources. Even if you end up buying goats from the first seller, you will get the chance to see other set-ups and how goats are living there.

Registered animals are more expensive, and even though you MAY decide to sell goats or milk in the future, maybe it makes sense to start with a non-registered goat or two. IF something goes wrong, you won't be out as much money.

My first goat -- and the next four -- came from someone who bred African pygmy/Nigerian dwarf crosses. When my bottle baby needed a goat friend (Rocky lived indoors while he was on the bottle), I got a second kid from Dave. That kid developed a respiratory infection and, despite vet care, didn't make it. Had I been out $400, it would have hurt my pocketbook as much as my heart.

The thing is, no matter what you decide, you will come across challenges that no one can prepare you for. You'll probably beat yourself up for not anticipating things you didn't even imagine could happen. BUT, I think it's worth it because goats are incredible creatures. My Rocky lived to be 12, and I couldn't have loved him more. He's been gone for four years, and I keep his ashes in my bedroom. So, I may not be your typical goat owner!
 

Livia Stouffer

Chirping
Jul 8, 2020
73
87
53
Petal, Mississippi
If any of my posts seem to be unfinished or otherwise wonky, my laptop is on its last leg and I am awaiting a replacement.

So, as I was going to say before my computer refused to cooperate, is that I think it's a good idea to shop around and look at other sources. Even if you end up buying goats from the first seller, you will get the chance to see other set-ups and how goats are living there.

Registered animals are more expensive, and even though you MAY decide to sell goats or milk in the future, maybe it makes sense to start with a non-registered goat or two. IF something goes wrong, you won't be out as much money.

My first goat -- and the next four -- came from someone who bred African pygmy/Nigerian dwarf crosses. When my bottle baby needed a goat friend (Rocky lived indoors while he was on the bottle), I got a second kid from Dave. That kid developed a respiratory infection and, despite vet care, didn't make it. Had I been out $400, it would have hurt my pocketbook as much as my heart.

The thing is, no matter what you decide, you will come across challenges that no one can prepare you for. You'll probably beat yourself up for not anticipating things you didn't even imagine could happen. BUT, I think it's worth it because goats are incredible creatures. My Rocky lived to be 12, and I couldn't have loved him more. He's been gone for four years, and I keep his ashes in my bedroom. So, I may not be your typical goat owner!
I completely understand your laptop situation. Mine hasn't been too great either on getting my notifications to me.
Another interesting thing the guy said was that if we were to get a kid then we should get it within a week that it's born or when it's a year to two years old just so either we know what's being put in them and how they're being taken care of, or so they're past the age where they're susceptable to so many different things. He said he had some bad experinces with breeders selling him weaned kids that were a bit sickly. But we still aren't sure of what we're deciding on yet, and I really appriciate all the help and feedback I've been getting from here! On a sidenote, I'd love to hear about any goat stories anyone may have!!
 

cassie

Crowing
Mar 19, 2009
6,567
3,186
441
One thing you might consider is electric poultry fencing. It is lightweight, portable, easy to install, and from what I have read does a good job of keeping the goats in and the predators out. It is available from Premier. The other thing is to get more than one goat and to be sure they are vaccinated with CD/T which helps to prevent tetanus and enterotoxemia.
 

docteurmccoy

Songster
Nov 23, 2020
312
1,324
133
My Coop
Hi! Nubians sound great, I have a couple nubian/boer crosses. We've had goats the longest, over a decade. There's so much to be said.
The first two things I can think of are if you happen to have sheep, or plan on getting sheep, don't let the sheep get into the goat feed. Sheep can't take copper, but goats need copper so it's in their feed.

Put out loose minerals for them, and arguably most importantly **put out baking soda** for them to lick as they want. Don't worry, they won't take more than they need, but if they need it you do not want them to not have it. Basically the baking soda prevents bloat, which is arguably pretty common but also very deadly.

I can't think of anything else super important to say, other than you need very good fencing. Honestly just do lots and lots of research and reading, and keep an eye on them closely so you can notice problems before they get too bad. Best of luck!!

edit; Also I agree on starting out with non-registered goats. Obviously up to you but not a bad idea
 

lomine

Crowing
Aug 7, 2015
2,833
2,896
336
Peyton, CO
The number one most important thing is that you get goats from a herd that is tested annually. Many diseases are highly contagious and have no cure. The seller should be able to provide negative test results. Save yourself the heartache (and money) and just avoid buying from anyone that doesn't test.

I would not recommend bottle kids for inexperienced goat owners. They are so much work and there can be a lot of issues if you don't know what you're doing. I personally don't like bottle babies either. I find them to be very pushy. I had a rejected kid I had to feed and he was very sweet but just always under my feet and in my face. But that's just my preference on that.

I register my goats because it allows me to sell kids at a higher price and gives me a bigger potential buyer pool. I don't do any showing. I might do LA and milk testing but that won't be any time soon.

I read many years ago that if a doe isn't breed my 2 years old, she will have problems getting pregnant. I don't know how true that is but it is something to consider if you aren't sure about breeding. A couple of wethers might be a better options as your starters.
 

Livia Stouffer

Chirping
Jul 8, 2020
73
87
53
Petal, Mississippi
I would not recommend bottle kids for inexperienced goat owners. They are so much work and there can be a lot of issues if you don't know what you're doing. I personally don't like bottle babies either. I find them to be very pushy. I had a rejected kid I had to feed and he was very sweet but just always under my feet and in my face. But that's just my preference on that.

I read many years ago that if a doe isn't breed my 2 years old, she will have problems getting pregnant. I don't know how true that is but it is something to consider if you aren't sure about breeding. A couple of wethers might be a better options as your starters.
Thank you for your suggestions! It really means a lot to have so many experienced goat people giving me advice.
I agree with your bottle feeding tip, because so far all the goat owners we've met have been very hands on with their goats and they were very friendly towards us so I'm not too worried about not bonding with them (All of my roosters used to be someone's problem bird, so I'm used to a few months of distant animals, I know almost all bonding takes time and effort.)
I'm hoping to find some that are either a year old so we have some time to ease into the goat owning before getting serious about dairy, or some who have already been bred before, but out of milk (Is that a term? haha I also need to learn goat terminology ).
 

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