Mean Isa Brown Rooster- At wits end!!!!

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by brwneggs, Aug 3, 2010.

  1. brwneggs

    brwneggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 21, 2010
    Northern Indiana
    I need help please-as soon as possible.
    The Isa Brown rooster that I got, is tearing the feathers out of the girl's back end. He picks at them if they are laying down, he picks at them as they are going into the roost. I caught him taking his foot raking over another hen laying on the ground. It isnt the same hen he picks at ether.
    My dad is upset at me and said, "See I told you we should have got barred rock instead of some genetic birds".
    I am at my wits end, I can not get into the pen- its a mobile.
    I called the Amish men, that we got them from- and left a message.
    If anyone has a solution, please tell me. If you want to, please come pick him up. ASAP! In the physical sense!
    Thank you!!!
     
  2. brwneggs

    brwneggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 21, 2010
    Northern Indiana
    The rooster is gone. He also got to the point of not letting the hens out in the morning. Hope the hens will be ok. The Amish guy called while he was in town, and said they will be ok. My dad does not think they will do ok.
    Will the hens be ok without the roo?
    [​IMG]
     
  3. MontanaMomma

    MontanaMomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 7, 2008
    Of course your hens will be okay without a roo! They don't need noo stinking roo! [​IMG] My hens have been quite content without a roo for their whole lives. One hen has taken on the protector aggressive role and takes care of the flock like a rooster without the meanness. I don't think I would EVER put a rooster in with hens if the hens have no escape from him... unless it was a very special roo. Good riddance!
     
  4. brwneggs

    brwneggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    MontanaMomma-
    I hope one hen did not pick up his bad habit of pecking. She was doing that when he was around. Right now, this evening they seem very passive, and are able to sit in the grass. Everytime they layed down, they were pecked.
    MontanaMomma, they will know when to come out and when to go in at night, wont they with out him around?
     
  5. brwneggs

    brwneggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 21, 2010
    Northern Indiana
    I am still new at the chicken learning. After a roo is gone, and maybe it happened during the time he was there, "do hens still squawk at each other"? Is that natural? [​IMG]
     
  6. BeccaB00

    BeccaB00 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Your hens are gonna be fine with out a rooster. What do u mean 'squawk at each other'? [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2010
  7. buckabucka

    buckabucka Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    Really, I think there are only 2 reasons to keep a rooster: if you want to breed him and raise your own chicks, or if your chickens free-range and you want him to help protect the flock. (Or I suppose, some people just love roosters).

    If you are not breeding or free-ranging, you still have to feed him and don't get much in return. I know lots of people whose chickens free-range and they never saw need for a rooster.

    I think your hens will adjust just fine. They are probably so happy to see that nasty rooster go! Some roosters are nice, and some are not. If, after a period of time, you feel you really want a rooster, try a different breed.
    Good luck with your chickens! [​IMG]
    Robin
     
  8. turtlebird

    turtlebird Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 11, 2009
    ahhhh, be gentle with yourself. We are all learning, that is why we come here (BYC) [​IMG]
    Sounds like you did the right thing. I am on my second "batch" of chickens. I, have a nasty hen in the first flock that has always made a habit of pulling everyone else's feathers out. I tried to 'modify' her behavior (separation), and her diet (higher
    proteins). In hindsight, I think what I should have done was send her to freezer camp. Feather picking is a horrible habit. Sometimes it is a protein deficiency, sometimes it is a nasty temperament.
    I now have NO tolerance for bullies in a flock, be it roos or hens. It makes things SO stressful.
    Genetics vs. traditional breeds? You can get "nasties" in any breed.
    Your hens will be fine without a roo. Watch their behavior as they settle into more peaceful existence.
    Good luck
     
  9. midget_farms

    midget_farms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 15, 2008
    Dunlap Illinois
    you did right by removing the roo. Your birds will be fine & they know better than he when to leave & return to the coop. never fear they are smarter than they look!

    Keep in mind that there is a pecking order. One hen will be the 'head hen'. We call ours 'big momma' because she is literally bigger than the rest. Big Momma will pick on the others - its in their nature. But if the order is established it won't be more than a peck or two & never a serious fight. The others will run if she gives them the stink eye. This is normal & ensures harmony in the flock. Its when you mess up this pecking order that issues arrise, & usually not too serious. Just more arguing than normal.

    Hens will talk to each other too. They holler & squalk & make all kinds of crazy noises. Especially I've found if something bugs them while laying an egg. They can make all kinds of racket. Its all normal.

    As far as any perminant damage from the goofy roo - I'd bet a dozen eggs they don't even remember him by now.
     
  10. MontanaMomma

    MontanaMomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Your hens will be just fine. If there isn't any blood and/or guts, and they are all walking around on two legs, they are probably doing okay. They go back to the coop just fine. They know where their food is. [​IMG]
     

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