Metal coops

HuskerHens18

Crowing
Mar 11, 2018
2,158
4,965
397
Chickenlandia
I'm using a metal coop for my adult chickens right now. One thing I notice is the tempature doesn't stay consistent. So I don't suggest putting chicks in there when they're still sensitive. My adult birds are fine with it, I haven't had any issues thus far. I've had it since last October.
 

Foster's Freehold

Songster
6 Years
Jun 7, 2013
346
458
182
South Central KY
The thing about metal coops is the temperature issues. It gets very very hot, it gets very very cold. Both of those, unless you have some sincere ventilation, can be the cause of heat stroke or frostbite and respiratory issues.

If you are going to use a metal building, you need lots and lots and lots of ventilation. Since chicken breath and poo gives off so much moisture, you have to have the ventilation to get it out of the coop. If you don't, you get condensation and wet birds. Wet birds are not good in the winter.

In the summer, it gets like an oven. Every surface you touch is burning hot. Even at night when temps are cooler, you can end up with chickens having heat issues.

To combat the design issues, you can insulate parts of it, add lots of ventilation in a flow pattern for your interior lay out, grow climbing vines over it, plant shade trees around it, use water for evaporative cooling in the summer.
 

Daddysbaby1

Chirping
6 Years
Sep 15, 2013
9
9
54
Middle Tennessee
The thing about metal coops is the temperature issues. It gets very very hot, it gets very very cold. Both of those, unless you have some sincere ventilation, can be the cause of heat stroke or frostbite and respiratory issues.

If you are going to use a metal building, you need lots and lots and lots of ventilation. Since chicken breath and poo gives off so much moisture, you have to have the ventilation to get it out of the coop. If you don't, you get condensation and wet birds. Wet birds are not good in the winter.

In the summer, it gets like an oven. Every surface you touch is burning hot. Even at night when temps are cooler, you can end up with chickens having heat issues.

To combat the design issues, you can insulate parts of it, add lots of ventilation in a flow pattern for your interior lay out, grow climbing vines over it, plant shade trees around it, use water for evaporative cooling in the summer.
We will be insulating it, putting in two 24 by 24 windows, it has vents in the loft area, it will be going under trees that shade the yard from the West, it the house will block from the east, and trees from the South.
 

Foster's Freehold

Songster
6 Years
Jun 7, 2013
346
458
182
South Central KY
That all sounds like a go then. Metal buildings are often the cheapest and quickest way to go as long as you compensate for the flaws.
Keep an eye on the vents though, if you ever see condensation inside, you will have to add more.
 

Daddysbaby1

Chirping
6 Years
Sep 15, 2013
9
9
54
Middle Tennessee
They will also have a fenced free range area about 20ft by 50ft with a hedge of chicken herbs for ten hens and a rooster will be partially covered for shade and winter. So coop is for nights and egg laying mainly
 

jadorsey9

Songster
7 Years
Apr 29, 2013
55
36
121
Fort Worth, Texas

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jadorsey9

Songster
7 Years
Apr 29, 2013
55
36
121
Fort Worth, Texas
Here are some pictures of my metal coop. The galvanized roof is actually cooler in the summer and deflects some heat. Plus it’s open and allows for lots of breeze. The hens love it!
 

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