MJ's little flock

Martaals

Chirping
Jan 20, 2020
82
427
67
The Netherlands
It's very interesting and whatever the sound means it's an important part of their communication. I get whole tribes doing it. Think though that this sound and whatever it is associated with is important enough to overide getting treats and here, even being safe undercover. The call starts and they just stop where they are and whatever they are doing and freeze.
That is truly amazing, and very fascinating.
 

Martaals

Chirping
Jan 20, 2020
82
427
67
The Netherlands
One of the best things about byc is that there's always someone with more experience, like Shad, willing to comment and share their thoughts. It's probably the best resource there is for day to day chicken care and observation :)
Yes, you're right, it's also way more fun than trying to read up and becoming a chicken scholar 🤓

How are you're girls doing now?
 

Shadrach

Roosterist
Jul 31, 2018
10,774
71,664
1,352
Catalonia, Spain
My Coop
My Coop
Yeah, I guess context makes a big deal to learn what they are on about.
I think I can imagine the louder one as well, with a kind of dragging "worry" before the r gets present? Haha, so hard to write down chicken sounds. Was it a cluck or a clu-uck? 🤣
Ahh, I am so curious to learn all these sounds, for sure a bird wouldn't make so much fuss for nothing, there must be like tons of stuff going on. With the cats I know a lot of the sounds apart and they are very communicative and easy to decode, which makes it so much easier to take care of them. For chickens a little tutorial would be great. Is there like a good guide somewhere, like... I remember for horses they have these picture books showing what different states of mind look like. But then perhaps an audio library or something🤭
Unfortunately there are no good guides on chicken communication.
I have over 30 recorded and identified calls.
There are a few that are relatively easy to identify. A lot of observation of what actually happens when these calls are made does eventually give a valid conclusion regarding what they mean.
I wrote an article for BYC on one very misunderstood call.
Other relatively easy to identify calls are for examples;
The predator warning call given by roosters. There are two main types, one for aerial predators and another for ground predators or perceived threats.
The I've found food call.
The send chicks to cover call.
The return to mother call.
The heads up call for creatures events that are not perceived as an immediate threat.
The make nest call.
And many more.:)
 

Martaals

Chirping
Jan 20, 2020
82
427
67
The Netherlands
Unfortunately there are no good guides on chicken communication.
I have over 30 recorded and identified calls.
There are a few that are relatively easy to identify. A lot of observation of what actually happens when these calls are made does eventually give a valid conclusion regarding what they mean.
I wrote an article for BYC on one very misunderstood call.
Other relatively easy to identify calls are for examples;
The predator warning call given by roosters. There are two main types, one for aerial predators and another for ground predators or perceived threats.
The I've found food call.
The send chicks to cover call.
The return to mother call.
The heads up call for creatures events that are not perceived as an immediate threat.
The make nest call.
And many more.:)
Super interesting
I suppose with just three female chickens all the same age no one laying yet a lot of the communication must be about other things because they are really chatty with a big variety of sounds. Can't distinguish it yet but I highly doubt they would make themselves vulnerable by chatting nonsense. I will check the article!
 

RoyalChick

Songster
Nov 3, 2019
280
2,678
201
Northern New Jersey
My Coop
My Coop
Unfortunately there are no good guides on chicken communication.
I have over 30 recorded and identified calls.
There are a few that are relatively easy to identify. A lot of observation of what actually happens when these calls are made does eventually give a valid conclusion regarding what they mean.
I wrote an article for BYC on one very misunderstood call.
Other relatively easy to identify calls are for examples;
The predator warning call given by roosters. There are two main types, one for aerial predators and another for ground predators or perceived threats.
The I've found food call.
The send chicks to cover call.
The return to mother call.
The heads up call for creatures events that are not perceived as an immediate threat.
The make nest call.
And many more.:)
I love the sound they make when they are dust bathing and clearly soooo happy. I call that sound the chicken purr and it seems to be just an individual sound of contentment rather than talking to the other chickens. Then as you said, they make a sound similar to that but all together when they are just hanging out being chickens. It is a similar 'purr' but not the same and then they are clearly communicating. Though sometimes I think it is maybe just for my benefit - like people in crowd scenes in theater can say 'rhubarb, rhubarb' and it sounds like people really speaking in the background. So I call that the 'rhubarb' sound. I love that you are recording them - I can imagine a mix would be soothing at night for people who can't get to sleep!
 
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