Need Electric Fencing Advice

Aunt Angus

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5 Years
Jul 16, 2018
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Nevada County, CA
I'm a little shook after a fox visit this evening. It didn't get any of my birds (my cat actually ran it off), but it has me re-examining my fencing situation. And I'm glad I did because it is SERIOUSLY lacking!

I have my flock in a shed next to a tall retaining wall. Not an ideal spot, but it's what we had to work with when we moved in. The shed/coop opens onto a large wire dog kennel run that has hardware cloth around it. It also has a buried hardware cloth apron that extends out 2 ft. The run is very secure. I feel very confident that they are safe in there. But being penned up all the time is no life for a chicken.

The run opens into a large foraging area that is surrounded by electric netting and covered by aviary netting (the heavy duty stuff). The electric netting starts at the retaining wall, goes in front of the run, makes a sort of half circle around the coop and run, and ends back at the retaining wall about 20 feet behind the coop.

Here's where it gets tricky. The retaining wall that is next to the coop is tall enough that a predator would not have any problem bypassing the electric netting and jumping onto the coop, which would allow it to get into the foraging area by tearing through the aviary netting.

Now, there is a fence along the top of the retaining wall. Here's my question:

If I install electric along the 3 ft fence at the top of the retaining wall, will it be enough to deter a fox? Or would it just jump over it?

Here's a (badly drawn) diagram. I can't quite get pics. I will try to get video tomorrow.
16545770573535662305105033189898.jpg


Poke holes in this plan, please. If my diagram is as bad as I think it is, let me know/ask questions. It's not a matter of *if* a fox tries to get my birds anymore. For now, they will stay penned.

Note: I WILL be moving the coop soon, but there was a big storm at the end of last year that caused significant damage to my property. When that cleanup is done, we will move them and the goats.
 
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Since your 3 foot fence is off the ground,,, you would need to install a Hot wire,, and an alternating Grounding wire. The fox would have to be scrambling up the fence, and touch a Hot and A Ground to get zapped.
If you get some pix posted,, it may be easier to visualize, and offer a solution.
 
Since your 3 foot fence is off the ground,,, you would need to install a Hot wire,, and an alternating Grounding wire. The fox would have to be scrambling up the fence, and touch a Hot and A Ground to get zapped.
If you get some pix posted,, it may be easier to visualize, and offer a solution.
I'll do my best in the morning. It's very confusing. I appreciate your reply.
 
Here is what I meant by budget DIY version. There are many others posting similar on YouTube.
Have you used this method to keep predators out? Seems would be great for a lower risk situation (like keeping a pet in), but would it really keep a fox or coyote out? I'm interested since it's not electric... but wondering if it's too good to be true.
 
Is it possible to run a 2 single wires parallel with each other with the fence along the wall? One about a foot before the wall about 8 inches off the ground and another a foot before that one same height? So it would be almost impossible for a fox to make it over without being shocked. Also remember it's a mind game too. Once one gets shocked it won't go back by it. The risk over reward is too great
 
Is it possible to run a 2 single wires parallel with each other with the fence along the wall? One about a foot before the wall about 8 inches off the ground and another a foot before that one same height? So it would be almost impossible for a fox to make it over without being shocked. Also remember it's a mind game too. Once one gets shocked it won't go back by it. The risk over reward is too great
That's all true. I haven't done anything yet, actually. What I'm planning on doing is something like what you suggest. I was going to use 2 sections of electric netting all on the wall so that it extends well before and well after the area that would give it entrance into the chicken yard. Haven't done it yet because the length I need is out of stock everywhere. Hubby and I decided on this course of action because we can use the netting for our goats once we move the chickens to the new coop (eventually... when we have the time and money... which seems like it'll never happen with this @^%#! inflation).
 
Have you used this method to keep predators out? Seems would be great for a lower risk situation (like keeping a pet in), but would it really keep a fox or coyote out? I'm interested since it's not electric... but wondering if it's too good to be true.
I just posted a DIY option. If you have the funds,, then opt for the professional grade rollers. Here is a link. Read how it works. Then make your own opinion if DIY is close enough to be effective.
https://rollersdirect.com/blogs/coyote-roller-news/do-coyotes-jump-over-fences-to-attack-dogs

This one My BFF was looking to get to protect his yard from coyotes. Am sure it will stop a fox just the same.
He would mount this on fence that was put up (owned) by neighbor. He is not sure neighbor would want a DIY on an ornate expensive fence.
 

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