Need help on hoop run design

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Trish1974, Jun 4, 2017.

  1. Trish1974

    Trish1974 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would like to make an extension off my main chicken run and considered going with a hoop design. I decided to go that route because my main objective in this project is getting my girls more shade, and I figured it would be easier to tarp a hoop than build additional shade shelters. I have found many pictures and threads online and on this site regarding hoop coops, however when it comes to directions on attaching the pvc, conduit or cattle panels to the bottom boards (I have not yet decided which to use) the directions are skimpy. Wind and snow are an issue in my area, so what would be the best way to support the arch AND connect the pvc/conduit to the bottom? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    I would think any strong bottom frame (so the pushing out force of the bent arch parts, pvc or whatever, don't bust it.) Would work.

    Just remember that:
    1. The steeper the slope, the easier it is for the snow to slide off and not bust it.
    2. Spray the cover with Pan or something similar to make it easier for the snow to slide off.
     
  3. cholland

    cholland Out Of The Brooder

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    If you use cattle panels you don't need pvc poles. If you don't plan to move it, you can drive some fence posts in the ground for anchors. Or short pieces of rebar. Put caps on the rebar to avoid injury.
    I built a wood frame. Two 4x4 skids with 2x4s on the ends. I used fence staples. The big galvanized kind about 1 1/2" long. Fastened on the outside. Nailed one end, bent it over and had someone hold it while I nailed in the other side. Space them about every 6 inches.
    I drag mine all around the property and the staples are not coming loose at all.
     
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  4. hegazi

    hegazi Out Of The Brooder

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    Is it possible to connect 2 cattle panels for a wider run? Or will they sag?
     
  5. cholland

    cholland Out Of The Brooder

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    I think connecting two panels like that would be tough. There is a lot of tension in the bent panel. The joint would need to be super strong. There is another person on here who cut theirs in half to get them home and is probably going to end up with an A frame structure.
    You can put more on the end and make the hoop longer, but if I wanted to make it wider I might consider just building a pole barn.
     
  6. Kellycbf

    Kellycbf Out Of The Brooder

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    paintedChix and Trish1974 like this.
  7. Trish1974

    Trish1974 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks everyone! @Kellycbf, the article was very helpful!
     
    Kellycbf likes this.
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Maybe more details here:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/aarts-hoop-coop-chicken-tractor.72211/

    I used closet clamps to attach livestock panels to base frame.

    Ziptied multiple panels together, I used clamps and vice grips to get them into position where necessary.

    Cattle panels will be more likely to sag than hog panels...there's more wire in hog panels so they are stiffer/stronger.....but wooden framing can be used to stiffen any panels against sagging.
     
    Kellycbf likes this.
  9. Trish1974

    Trish1974 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Your article was perfect, @aart ! Very detailed, which is what I needed. Thank you so much!
     
  10. paintedChix

    paintedChix Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I no longer remember whose instructions we used for our hoop coops. Did some of our own design for pop doors - using scrap lumber and bottom cracked buckets.

    We put them on a wooden frame, with the combo panels being stapled w/ fence staples on the inside of the frame. Joining panels together for length wasn't a problem. I'm going to have to figure out how to do that kind of coop page like AART has done - very informative and then I won't have to re-post pics all the time (though I don't mind)...

    We attached the panels long edges together w/ zip ties, then attached the panels to the boards on each end with fence staples (this original one the 3/4" staples wouldn't even go around the panel and the 1-1/4" staples didn't hold either. We've gone to 1-1/2 or 2" staples since then). Then we rolled the panels up & over and held them in place with ropes while putting on the end boards with lag screws. Didn't even have the ends done yet, when started using it for the chicks. That would come 3 months later when I got more lumber/tools.

    14jun22coop595.jpg 14jun22coop601.jpg

    14jun22coop605.jpg 14jul7pcoop085.jpg

    Here are some pics after we finished the front & back of the hoop coop. The bucket lid is attached to the bucket via a rope braided out of used haystring. Pop the lid off & the chickens leave thru it to free range. Once they are back in the coop in the evening, you put the lid back on. Worked great on that property as did the chicken wire. On our current property - I no longer allow the chickens to free range due to predators and we use 1/4"-1/2" hardware cloth on the bottoms of the coops and we've also done hardware cloth on the ground to prevent critters from digging under the coops. We now use the buckets for nesting boxes.

    14sep21coop844.jpg 14sep21coop838.jpg

    My response to the thread that AART refers to is that IF you needed to join the panels together to make the base wider, TRY (I don't know if it will work) by overlapping the panels several squares, not keeping them end to end. That OP was trying to use a ridgepole and that could be attached centered between the two actual ends. Those ends will need to be roped, wired or clamped thoroughly due to the pressure (s) on them. If you do this, let us know. I'd LOVE to know if it would actually work :D
     

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