Need Help With Brooder

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Uncle Marc, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. Uncle Marc

    Uncle Marc Chillin' With My Peeps

    137
    5
    91
    Oct 12, 2011
    Poplar Grove Kentucky
    Just planned and built a brooder box. 2 feet by 4 feet by 2 feet. It looks kinda small to me. How many chicks will it hold and for how long. I hear they grow pretty fast.
     
  2. anthonyjames

    anthonyjames Chillin' With My Peeps

    680
    1
    149
    Apr 22, 2009
    Port Washington, WI
    based on 1/2 sqft per bird that will work for about 2 weeks and 16 chicks. After that you will need to double or triple the size.
     
  3. jmtcmkb

    jmtcmkb Chillin' With My Peeps

    496
    38
    121
    Sep 2, 2011
    New Hampshire
    Quote:I had 5 in one that exact same size, I had them in it for 5 weeks and they seemed pretty happy- I put them outside because of the mess, I made the sides of mine all hardware cloth and they were kicking out stuff right and left.
     
  4. Uncle Marc

    Uncle Marc Chillin' With My Peeps

    137
    5
    91
    Oct 12, 2011
    Poplar Grove Kentucky
    Two weeks? How much room do they need for the 6 weeks until feathered out?
     
  5. WhySayWhat

    WhySayWhat Chillin' With My Peeps

    523
    0
    119
    Nov 5, 2010
    Spokane
    My three chicks lasted about 8 weeks comfortably in a 50-gallon Rubbermaid tote, but the ceiling got very low for them! A 2 foot ceiling on the brooder is not going to be tall enough when they really start growing and feathering out...they need room to move around (vertically as well). An easier way of making a brooder is to know how many chicks you plan on getting and build it for twice that many. [​IMG]
     
  6. azygous

    azygous True BYC Addict

    10,761
    4,163
    501
    Dec 11, 2009
    Colorado Rockies
    Keep in mind that chicks DOUBLE in size each week. An area that will house six chicks comfortably for the first two weeks, will be much too small by week three. They also begin to use their wings to move vertically by week three. If they're to develop normally, you will need to provide them vertical space as well as horizontal.

    I slap two cardboard appliance boxes together, cut a hole in the adjoining wall, and end up with plenty of space for up to ten chicks. For more chicks, get more boxes. Cheesecloth stretched over the top will keep little jumpers in.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by