New Guinea

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by HopeK, Sep 13, 2013.

  1. HopeK

    HopeK New Egg

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    Sep 5, 2013
    Neebing, Ontario
    I managed to get a new guinea (female) to add to my flock of 7 males and one female (after losing 2 girls). I kept her in a cage during the evening and into the next day until about supper time. When I got home from work, I noticed that the other guineas were laying about her cage and seemed to just be getting acquainted. I thought, ok I will let her out now and keep an eye on her. Well, she was cautious and then bolted when the others got close. Then she flew up into a tree and I dont know how to get her down. Hindsight is 20/20. She is much more wild than my guys and girl. And obviously scared. Now I only want to get her down and safe. I need to get her back into the cage for at least a week before letting her free again. Any suggestions from anyone on how to get her down? It was a little chilly last night and I dont want her to get cold or picked off by an owl. I feel like such a bad bird mama. Can I tame her up a bit do you think? She did live as the only guinea in a group/gaggle of ducks and geese.
     
  2. HS Pye

    HS Pye Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 13, 2013
    Texas
    I'd wait till it's a little after sunset and then get her. Personally I keep new fowl in quarantine for at least two weeks. Usually three or four for a game bird or guinea. And then in the night ( that way they wake up they'll think she's always been there) when her quarantine time is up I'd put her with your other guineas and let her free range again.

    HS Pye
     
  3. HopeK

    HopeK New Egg

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    Sep 5, 2013
    Neebing, Ontario
    The good news is that she came down from the tree when I went into the house and she made her way back into the bird house. The bad news is that is seems like her and the orginal flock are not acceptng one another right now. She seems to be an outcast but is a little closer to the chickens...well the ones she doesnt chase and peck at! She has gone in at night and throughout the days for the last 2 days. I cannot get anywhere near her and she avoids the other guinea. They are talking to one another though and I am hoping that is a good sign.
     
  4. HopeK

    HopeK New Egg

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    Sep 5, 2013
    Neebing, Ontario
    The good news is that she came down from the tree when I went into the house and she made her way back into the bird house. The bad news is that is seems like her and the orginal flock are not acceptng one another right now. She seems to be an outcast but is a little closer to the chickens...well the ones she doesnt chase and peck at! She has gone in at night and throughout the days for the last 2 days. I cannot get anywhere near her and she avoids the other guinea. They are talking to one another though and I am hoping that is a good sign.
     
  5. HS Pye

    HS Pye Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 13, 2013
    Texas
    That is good news! I hope everything turns out all right. : )

    HS Pye
     
  6. nailladi

    nailladi Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 26, 2012
    Gainesville, GA.
    Agree with HP, always keep them in 2-3 weeks or more. All I could think of was a bar full of guys that have been in the service, would you want to be tossed in with them?? All of them?? I would start her out with one in the pen with her, you need way more hens! They will all go after her, poor girl. I would have ran too.[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2013
    2 people like this.
  7. PioneerPrincess

    PioneerPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 16, 2009
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    I agree with the above. With new guineas, especially adults, I usually quarantine them for two or so weeks, then introduce them to the other birds and keep them in their pen for an additional four weeks just so they know that this is home. Once the six weeks are up, then I will cut a wing just in case and let them free range. Guineas are very difficult to make tame. From what I've heard, you really have to work with them from when they're young to get them tame. So far, we haven't had much success with that. We are content to just enjoy the guineas and their wildness and their wonderful pest control. : ) Hmmm...she probably was a bit overwhelmed if she had all those guinea cocks (and hen) going to meet her! :) Just give her some time to adjust and she should be fine. : )
     
  8. HopeK

    HopeK New Egg

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    Sep 5, 2013
    Neebing, Ontario
    Every day is a little better. The new guinea began roosting with the group after 3 or 4 days. She follows the crowd, usually sticking to the outskirts of the flock but each day she gets closer and closer. The others do not chase her. They play and run around with her near by... she isnt quite ready to be in the thick of things yet but every day they grow a little closer. I am just happy that she seems happier! They will have lots of time over the winter to bond as the snow builds up!!
     
  9. dudefromtampa

    dudefromtampa Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 29, 2012
    I was wondering if that would work like it does with chickens (introducing them at night...)..but I have five guineas to introduce to a flock of the existing six (I've had for six months now). Would introducing that many (at night) work out pretty much the same way, or should I add one or two a night?

    THanks

    ==============================================================================================

    I'd wait till it's a little after sunset and then get her. Personally I keep new fowl in quarantine for at least two weeks. Usually three or four for a game bird or guinea. And then in the night ( that way they wake up they'll think she's always been there) when her quarantine time is up I'd put her with your other guineas and let her free range again.

    HS Pye
     
  10. PioneerPrincess

    PioneerPrincess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is what I do. With new guineas, especially adults, I usually quarantine them for two or so weeks, then introduce them to the other birds and keep them in their pen for an additional four weeks just so they know that this is home.

    Now, because predators keep taking my male guineas, I have only had experience with introducing a new male to our females. At the beginning of this year, I acquired a new male and after his quarantine time, put him in the pen with my two hens. He immediately showed his dominance and one of the hens loved him right away. The other hen took a while to takin' a likin' to him. It was a sight, though. One hen was following him and he was following the second hen so they were always together. I'm not sure how it'd go if you had males and females, but I'd probably go about it the same way. I will be having some young guineas we've raised up to introduce to the parents in a couple of months. I do hope it'll go well. They have already met through wire, but that doesn't always tell you everything. I hope that helps you a bit! : )
     

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