new horse question :)

My family just got 3 horses from a friend on our first farm. They were all green broke, but then the daughter of the friend moved away (in the air force) and they haven't been messed with since (6 yrs ago). My question is in regards to health treatments and stress. Moving is the most stressful thing most horses ever go through, I am aware, but they're in need of a ferrier visit, extensive grooming (hogging their dreaded manes and tails), routine worming and teeth floating, along with other various veterinary procedures (VAX, coggins, ect). What do I start with? I don't want to overload them, but they need so much done! any info needed to answer that I didn't provide?
Thank you all!!
 

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
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Mar 9, 2014
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Honestly - the things that need to be done, NEED to be done - so it really isn't a matter of what is/isn't too much. Barring a horse that arrives in seriously depleted condition, anything that sets hoof on my property is started on getting things done post haste. There is nothing on your list that I would feel to be "too much" for your situation as described thus far. In many ways, getting things done "all at once" can be less stressful than spreading it out over a period of time and going through the catch, hold for x procedure, release - repeat again two days from now.
 

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
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One question - financially are you able to address all of these concerns now or would you be better to wait and space the expenses out? If you would be better able to spread the expenses out (especially considering it is all x 3) I would prioritize not on a scale of stress, but on a scale of having identified the most pressingly needed items first....which would be evaluated on each individual horse.
 
Finances do not determine the order or spacing. As we saved up for the initial expense of getting them started, and can afford routine care. The individual basis does determine what needs to happen first I suppose, as one horse has the worst feet and no teeth problems, one the worst teeth and mild feet problems and one with only mild feet and teeth problems. But I'd still rather not throw money away on more than one vet call or farrier visit. I'd prefer to do all 3 at each visit. What is more pressing? Long hooves or long teeth? I'm not even totally sure what qualifies as needing teeth floated... :S I wanted to give them time between extensive visits, vet and farrier as they're basically wild animals, I mean, not really, but very unruly and easily freaked out.
 
OK, I've now done my research on horse theeth, I sincerely apologize for not doing that before posting question. I've come to the conclusion that its likely none need their teeth floated, just need to have the vet look I'm their mouths for broken, or bad teeth when she's here for VAX and such. My assumption that teeth needed floating was based on my pre mom vet clinic job, for a DVM who was inclined to prescribe unnecessary procedues for profit.
 

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
20,622
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Oregon
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OK, I've now done my research on horse theeth, I sincerely apologize for not doing that before posting question. I've come to the conclusion that its likely none need their teeth floated, just need to have the vet look I'm their mouths for broken, or bad teeth when she's here for VAX and such. My assumption that teeth needed floating was based on my pre mom vet clinic job, for a DVM who was inclined to prescribe unnecessary procedues for profit.

Yes and no - I know, clear as mud, right? Teeth play a major role in so many areas of the horse that having them in the best possible condition is important. Many folks like the routine schedule approach to basic care such as equine dentistry, vaccinations, etc because it is more of a preventative measure that way than waiting for a problem to arise and then having to go about correcting it. *I* prefer to have a reliable, trusted professional (this can be a vet or an equine dentist or one of the non-professional horse folks whom I know well enough to trust with this sort of thing based on my knowledge of their knowledge and ability) evaluate each horse and go from there.
When I say teeth have an impact on a lot of things what I am getting at is that you can have a horse who seems to have a training/behavior issue, a horse that has a problem maintaining a healthy condition, etc and while it seems the fix might be a different bit, a different method of working with the horse, more work/less work, the latest tack gadget, more food, different food, de-worming, etc - the answer would really lie in a simple dental adjustment. I have seen folks put themselves and, worse, their horse through a whole lot of frustration, pain and expense in situations like that.
 

Bunnylady

POOF Goes the Pooka
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Sounds good!

Personally, I would put a lot of time into handling those horses between now and the farrier's visit. If they were green broke at some point, they should know about standing still and having their feet handled, but they probably need a refresher. Lots of praise and patience - pretend that these are babies that really don't know better. If they are really wild, you might want to get a mild tranquilizer from the vet to make them easier to handle. While a farrier is well versed in ways to make a horse stand still, they really don't enjoy having a trim turn into a rodeo, and a bad experience with a farrier can last a long, long time in a horse's mind (I have a mini that wigs out at one whiff of a leather apron thanks to a farrier giving her a rough time as a foal; fortunately, I can do the work she needs myself).

IME, every horse in a new situation acts a bit crazy. While they learn what to expect and what is expected of them, they are going to be a bit hyper. Some people prefer to wait until the animal has had a chance to "settle in" to try to teach them things, but others like to take advantage of the new horse's uncertainty to make it clear who's the boss. You don't need to be brutal about it, but some horses are a bit pushy ("boss mare" types, for example), and will try to take the 'upper hoof' if given the opportunity. Horses actually prefer a strong leader; being assertive and predictable lets them know that they can trust you to do the thinking, so they don't have to do it.
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It does take a bit of finesse, though; you need to know just when to be firm, and when to back off, or you can get hurt.
 
Bunny lady, yes 2 of them have been doing well for me picking their feet up, and working extensively with the 3rd. He's head horse, :). The ferrier that I'm having out is very experienced with corrective trimming and horses who haven't been handled much, he just has a good horse price and a naughty horse price. We'll see how it goes! Gonna cut off one mane and two tail dreads today, was able to get one girl totally brushed out and the other little lady's mane brushed out. Looks lime the big guy's gonna be a baldy tho ;)
 

Ol Grey Mare

One egg shy of a full carton. .....
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
20,622
15,042
821
Oregon
My Coop
My Coop
Bunny lady, yes 2 of them have been doing well for me picking their feet up, and working extensively with the 3rd. He's head horse,
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. The ferrier that I'm having out is very experienced with corrective trimming and horses who haven't been handled much, he just has a good horse price and a naughty horse price. We'll see how it goes! Gonna cut off one mane and two tail dreads today, was able to get one girl totally brushed out and the other little lady's mane brushed out. Looks lime the big guy's gonna be a baldy tho
wink.png
Get some show sheen or other conditioner spray - soak the mane and/or tail, let it set a bit and then start working. When my Yahzi came to us we were fairly sure we were going to have to roach her (massive knots complicated by burrs that had become tightened down to where they were wearing on the skin at the base of her mane and tail), but a bottle of show sheen and several hours later she was a whole new horse, with hair!
 

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