New member from NW Pennsylvania

oldcutlas

In the Brooder
Sep 11, 2019
6
38
38
Hi there. I'm anew member and plan to start my flock in the spring, I will be building my coop using pines that I am cutting down and milling my self, I plan to make a rustic log cabin style coop, and am going to free range as much I can. Does anyone have a suggestion for a hearty cold weather breed that is good for both eggs and meat. I am thinking Icelandic and RI reds.
 

BigBlueHen53

Peace, fear not.
Premium Feather Member
Mar 5, 2019
7,786
27,054
817
SE Missouri, USA
Hi there. I'm anew member and plan to start my flock in the spring, I will be building my coop using pines that I am cutting down and milling my self, I plan to make a rustic log cabin style coop, and am going to free range as much I can. Does anyone have a suggestion for a hearty cold weather breed that is good for both eggs and meat. I am thinking Icelandic and RI reds.
Google says Orpington is your best bet cold-hardy, dual-purpose bird. Speaking from experience I can also say this breed is laid-back, friendly, calm, good with people and other birds. They are not flighty or given to panic, but are mellow and curious. Ours were broody and good mothers their first year, but haven't gone broody since (one started to but I convinced her otherwise). They lay a nice size brown egg several times a week. They are clean-legged, so mo mud or snow mess, and have a small comb so no worries about frostbite. We haven't butchered one yet, but they feel reasonably solid and meaty when we pick one up. That's my story on them.
 

oldcutlas

In the Brooder
Sep 11, 2019
6
38
38
Google says Orpington is your best bet cold-hardy, dual-purpose bird. Speaking from experience I can also say this breed is laid-back, friendly, calm, good with people and other birds. They are not flighty or given to panic, but are mellow and curious. Ours were broody and good mothers their first year, but haven't gone broody since (one started to but I convinced her otherwise). They lay a nice size brown egg several times a week. They are clean-legged, so mo mud or snow mess, and have a small comb so no worries about frostbite. We haven't butchered one yet, but they feel reasonably solid and meaty when we pick one up. That's my story on them.

Thank you. I will definitely look into that breed and consider them for my flock. I intend to have multiple breeds and do some cross breeding
 

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