Next spring shed to coop design

Smileybans

Crowing
Nov 13, 2020
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Upstate New York
So next spring I’m going to buy a shed. Something like this...
CF21713F-5431-44F6-8F37-71AE18660BD0.jpeg
and turn it into a chicken coop. This is off of Lowe’s website. Currently my coop is housed inside my run. I won’t be able to do that with this shed. How do I attach the run, which I’m extending, to the shed? I’m planning on adding an automated pop door to go into the run. I also want the shed to be elevated but am pretty sure this type of shed doesn’t come with a floor. Can it even be elevated? I don’t want to pour concrete since my property sits on slate.
How would I make a floor for this shed? I’m thinking plywood and putting it on cinderblocks... would that work? Any help and advice is welcome.
A little more information: I currently have a 12x12 run with a 4x4 coop housed inside. I’m extending the run to 22x16 with the 8x10 shed on the 16’ south side of the run. The door to the shed would face west and the pop door letting the chickens into the run would be north.
 

Ted Brown

Crowing
Dec 12, 2018
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near Shawville Quebec Canada
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Regarding a elevated floor:

I assume you will be walking on it so would recommend building a conventional floor frame using 2" by 6" boards 16" on center (or you could use 2" by 8" 24" on center) with plywood over top. This would sit on cinder blocks, height to be determined by how much elevation you want to have. Shed would sit on top of this and would need to be fastened to the floor. I would add HC from top of the floor to the ground and then an HC apron around all exposed sides extending horizontally at least 12", preferably 16" out to prevent animals digging and taking up residence underneath.

The plastic sheds that I have seen usually have a floor. This is needed to add rigidity and strength to the overall structure, guessing that the shed shown above has one, the description should specify this. However, the shed is probably intended to sit on the ground, elevating it would require some sort of support structure for the floor itself.

Regarding attachment of the run:

Difficult to advise on this without a description of the run and some pictures.
 

Smileybans

Crowing
Nov 13, 2020
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Upstate New York
Regarding a elevated floor:

I assume you will be walking on it so would recommend building a conventional floor frame using 2" by 6" boards 16" on center (or you could use 2" by 8" 24" on center) with plywood over top. This would sit on cinder blocks, height to be determined by how much elevation you want to have. Shed would sit on top of this and would need to be fastened to the floor. I would add HC from top of the floor to the ground and then an HC apron around all exposed sides extending horizontally at least 12", preferably 16" out to prevent animals digging and taking up residence underneath.

The plastic sheds that I have seen usually have a floor. This is needed to add rigidity and strength to the overall structure, guessing that the shed shown above has one, the description should specify this. However, the shed is probably intended to sit on the ground, elevating it would require some sort of support structure for the floor itself.

Regarding attachment of the run:

Difficult to advise on this without a description of the run and some pictures.
Thank you. I wasn’t sure elevating it was possible but now I’m sure it is. Doing a conventional floor plan is what I thought I had to do but have never done this before. I planned on doing the HC around since I can’t enclose it in my run and have opossums that come to my ponds to drink.
I looked in the description, and maybe I overlooked it, but it didn’t say if it came with a floor. I hope it does though. It would make it easier to put together.
For the extension of the run I can provide the pictures of my current run and the plans for next years run.
image.jpg

this is the full extension. Drawn up roughly. I’m not an architect so I just drew it to make sense to me and my husband. The green is what’s already there.
image.jpg

this is where it would be placed in the yard. There are pods currently where the shed is going to go. Those are being moved in the spring.
0F453827-94C4-4D45-A825-29E9B185C8FC.jpeg
50355526-9B2A-4D94-BBA3-6FDFEE2B1FAF.jpeg

these are pictures of my current run in the winter. The best pictures I have of it anyway. If anymore information is needed let me know. I planned on using HC and welded wire for the extension and enclosing the top with wire or the plastic clear roofing as well.
 

Alaskan

The Frosted Flake
Premium Feather Member
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Jul 26, 2008
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Hummm

What would be great is if you could simply extend the roof of that shed, and the extended shed roof be the roof over the run.

Extending the solid roof, from the shed to over the run... means you can take out about 1/2 of the front shed wall, that would now be protected by the extended roof. Pre-built sheds often have way too little in terms of ventilation, and putting in a front wire wall will fix that issue.

Also, extending the roof means at least some of the run will be protected from snow. The pitch of the roof, is not enough to easily shed snow... but pitched enough you could help it along without too much trouble.

If the floor of the shed doesn't look very predator proof/chew proof, line it with hardware cloth.

As to a foundation, I like using skids... nice to be able to move it if needed.
 

Ted Brown

Crowing
Dec 12, 2018
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near Shawville Quebec Canada
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@Smileybans I live north of you, probably within 150 miles. You are in a snow belt with heavy snowfalls and winds.

I looked on the Lowes's site in Watertown, found the shed you show above. If you look at the pictures it shows a wooden structure with a floor. The shed is a very basic with walls constructed of 2" by 4"s 24" on center, roof is 2" by 6"s 24" on center. Walls are engineered particle board sheets finished on the outside, primed but unpainted. Roof material is unstated but you can assume it is standard particle board with (looks like) shingles on the roof. Comes as a kit that you assemble yourself. No detail provided for the floor, I would assume similar construction as the walls, hopefully floor joists are 16" on center but may be 24"?

The good news is that it will be easy to modify to suit your needs and is economical.

First off you will need to figure out how to add ventilation since it has none; there are a number of ways to do this the easiest being openings in the gable ends. I would also add a couple of windows (one per side) for light and additional ventilation. Both you and your chickens will appreciate.

I would add structure (ie 2" by 4"s, 2" by 6"s) to strengthen the walls, roof and probably the floor, Very easy to do as you assemble, use the pieces provided as templates and add studs, rafters, joists sufficient to end with 16" on center for everything. Not many additional pierces will be required so not expensive.

Depending on the elevation desired @Alaskan 's suggestion of skids would be a simple and effective way to go. Two 4" by 6" by 10' beams inset from the outside by 3' could work (would require 16" on center for the joists). As he suggested, I would add HC underneath the floor to deter predators (you will have lots: possums as you said and also raccoons, rats and many more you probably don't even know of).

I also like his suggestion of a roof extension to cover some or all of the run. However, the run structure you have is completely inadequate to accommodate this. You could add a roof over the extension only and build that portion in a manner to support a roof?

Your existing run is of concern. It looks like an open roof and walls of plastic HC with openings that will allow many predators easy access. Replace it with 1/2" HC and figure something out to enclose the roof.

None of what I have suggested is difficult, particularly given a basic structure to start with. That it is wood will make attaching the run straight forward. If you are concerned about your building skills I would spend the winter researching basic building techniques, YouTube is your friend although there are other resources that would provide the necessary knowledge.

Best of luck.
 
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Shezadandy

Crowing
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Sep 26, 2015
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Having done this more than once (on building #4) ...

If you want to elevate it, concrete pier blocks are a good option, or you can set 4x4s in concrete and build up from there. (pictures below)

I added a BUNCH more wood to my foundation and floor - because it's inexpensive to do --- and almost impossible to do later! I went a little over the top with the 9" spacing for my floor frame but ... I'll never have to deal with a sagging plywood floor. Use 3/4" plywood for the floor. Again, once it's in - that's it!

Most of these kits don't come with a floor and I consider that a BLESSING- because it would just be the 1/2" particle board s**t.

Some friendly suggestions: DON'T USE THE HARDWARE IT COMES WITH. I used all screws everywgere - including attaching the siding because it's much easier to change things later (and right then if an error happens.

Star drive screws are MUCH harder to strip than philips or flat head screws. And trust me- they don't send high quality screws!!!! Home Depot has a line of them that ALL use the T25 drill bit, regardless of length. The links are to the basic product - they come in lots of sizes.

GRK Fasteners #9 x 2-1/2 in. Star Drive Bugle Head R4 Multi-Purpose Wood Screw (300-Pack)-100101 - The Home Depot

Instead of 3/8" lag screws, I found HeadLOK structural wood screws so very easy to deal with. They come in a variety of lengths and package sizing - also kind of a star design head or there's also a hex head version. SO SO easy to deal with. Even the 6" zip right on in.

FastenMaster 3/16 in. 2-7/8 in. HeadLok Star Drive, Flat Head Wood Screw (12- Pack)-FMHLGM278-12 - The Home Depot

I strongly recommend putting horse stall mats over your plywood floor deck. This does a couple things. First, it will preserve the life of the plywood floor and it will keep all the things that they do to that floor (spilling water, pooping, wet muddy feet) from sinking in. I know some use linoleum - but the stall mats give excellent traction and stand up to just about anything. They also make a nice gasket for the building. Of course you'll need longer screws when attaching the wall frames to the floor frames, but otherwise it's simple enough.

Adding a ridge vent makes a big difference when it comes to ventilation.
Using hopper windows is another of my favorite tricks because when open, the glass is totally horizontal, leaving the entire window opening available for ventilation - instead of 1/2 the space being glass (which will build more heat in summer).

TAFCO WINDOWS 31.75 in. x 15.75 in. Hopper Vinyl Window with Screen-PV-HOP 32x16 - The Home Depot


Another way to add to the ventilation is to replace the shed door that comes with a kit with a security screen door. It will be a little more work because of the double door situation. Personally I would exclude the double door - use a metal screen door- and then do a "side light" with hardware cloth frames on either side for additional ventilation. Or you can rig it so it's behind the solid door since you're in a colder climate --

Unique Home Designs 36 in. x 80 in. Su Casa Black Surface Mount Outswing Steel Security Door with Expanded Metal Screen-5SH202BLACK36 - The Home Depot

In mine, I installed a barn fan (made for dusty conditions, unlike anything that's for a house, like attic fans which state not for use in animal facilities) opposite my metal security door. It's just like framing a window- pop into the hole, 4 screws later - plug it in, and done.

Indoor/Outdoor Shutter Barn Fan J&D MFG - Stalls | Stable Equipment Supplies (valleyvet.com)

As others have mentioned, extending the roof overhang on all sides is a GREAT way to shade the walls and PROTECT your siding from weather. You'll have to get some additional plywood, but it's worth it. Again, really and truly- a ridge vent will help soooo much, especially in a cold climate where expelling moisture is vital to preventing frostbite. Also much harder to add later- so do it up front.

Photos:

Foundations:

Concrete encased 4x4s

Main frame 2.jpg
Floor frame.jpg


Horse stall mats over the floor- they come in 4x6 and 4x8ft sizes:
Matted floor.jpg



This is my pier block version of the foundation. The kit shed behind it was for goats, so they didn't get the security screen door.

New Foundation.jpg
 
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Smileybans

Crowing
Nov 13, 2020
1,470
3,254
286
Upstate New York
@Ted Brown
Thank you for the plethora of information. It’s all very helpful. My current run, you can’t tell from the pictures, has two layers of HC four feet from the bottom. It is enclosed with lattice and HC on the top. One portion has a tarp over it. The HC and fencing is also dug two feet into the ground. When extending this run should I scrap all the existing fencing and just use new? The green fencing I read after I put it up that raccoons can chew through it. My husband said we can cut the fencing and just open up the walls but I’m not sure about that now.
I was thinking the same thing about the roof extension and my run structure. With how much snow we get I can see it caving in. But I like the idea of the extended roof.
I had planned on adding ventilation, since I know that’s a problem with sheds, to the gables as suggested.
I’m not sure what you mean by skids. I’m sure I could google it but I feel like I might get it wrong.😅
All of the wildlife here is why I want to elevate the shed. I have trail cameras on my property and boy do I wish some days I didn’t. Watching a video of darkness then a bobcat showing up is creepy. But six pairs of glowing eyes staring at the camera from the darkness gave me chills.
 

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