No eggs...?

diamondsilkies

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Oct 23, 2017
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I have a welsummer and an easter egger that I got back in February from the local feed store. They are almost 9 months old now, so they should be laying, correct? I have not gotten any eggs from my welsummer, and only two eggs (several days apart) from my EE back in September. Nothing since. At first I figured maybe it was just the cold weather, but I read somewhere recently that year old pullets should (for the most part) lay through winters. Our winters only get down to around 40 F as well, and most of my other girls (including my silkies and seramas, who are supposed to be spotty layers) have been keeping up with the laying, if not a little slower than usual. They are eating layer feed with the occasional treat, and have calcium supplied as they need it. Their feathers look healthy, but I went ahead and checked both girls for lice/mites anyways. They are clean. Droppings look fine as well.

Am I just being an anxious chicken parent? I certainly don't mind waiting a couple more months, my other girls have been supplying me with all the eggs I need. Just wanted to make sure there was nothing wrong.
 

oldhenlikesdogs

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What protein percentage is your layer? How long have they been eating that? I would try putting them back on a non medicated grower with a separate bowl of oyster shells for the calcium needs and see if it helps.

Are they confined? Could they be laying elsewhere?
 

azygous

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Pullets shouldn't get layer feed until they produce the first egg. They need the higher protein and do not need the calcium until their bodies start building eggs.

You might be able to kick start their laying by putting a low wattage light on a timer in the coop to come on a couple hours before sunrise to make up for the short days. Layers need from 12 to 14 hours of daylight in order to trigger the laying hormones.
 

diamondsilkies

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Oct 23, 2017
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Southern Arizona
They are confined for most of the day, and when I let them out I keep a close eye on them, so I would most likely see them laying. For calcium, I have a separate container of egg shells that have been crushed very finely. I can't remember the protein percentage off the top of my head....I'll check tomorrow and see if I saved the ingredients from the last bag. When the EE layed her first egg, I moved the pair of them to the layer pen, figuring the welsummer would start laying very soon and that going together would make the transition easier, since they are very close. I'll try to move the welsummer back to the grower crumble pen tomorrow.

It sounds like it could be the short daylight, too. Again, I don't really mind the lack of eggs, but was just worried that I was doing something wrong, so I'll try to give it a couple more months and see if they start laying in spring.
 

oldhenlikesdogs

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Oyster shells are a better option as they stay in the body longer and available longer where eggshells aren't. Eggshells are a good supplement, but shouldn't be all that is offered.
 

aart

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I'll try to move the welsummer back to the grower crumble pen tomorrow.
You could just feed all your birds an 'all flock' type feed...it's much simpler than moving birds between pens.
Oyster shell and ground chicken egg shells mixed in separate container for the layers.
Grower, starter, all flock...just look for protein and calcium percentages.
Read the nutrient tags sewn into bottom of bag instead of the other words printed on bag.
 

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