Not an Emergency...Marek's in the Flock

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Haunted55, Feb 3, 2013.

  1. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    Well, we'll hope for the best for your silkie.

    When I got into chickens, I never gave a thought to when they die or what illness can kill them. But I try real hard to hold this thought, that to avoid all the sadness, would be to not have any at all.
     
  2. schnebbles

    schnebbles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was just out there and she can lift her leg, she was biting at her foot, like why aren't you working foot? :(

    Do you think I should bring her in for a day or 2? it's not real cold here so the temps shouldn't bother her, I just feel bad her limping everywhere.

    Ya, Seminole, I thought about them dying, but never thought of all these problems and I didn't realize mareks was very common.

    I keep hoping this is an injury, I'm sure I'm in denial. My husband just asked if she would die and I said probably [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2013
  3. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I hope it's just an injury.
     
  4. schnebbles

    schnebbles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    thanks seminole. I know it's not. I know it's mareks. She's just like the other one who died. This is so awful I can't even believe it.

    Has anyone ever heard of vitamin D? years ago, I had an episode that I was sure was MS (went to neurologist - never had another episode, knock on wood) - anyhow, I remember I was taking lots of vitamin D. I might try that as well. I don't think you can have too much vit D - I think it's importance is starting to come around more.
     
  5. julie0477

    julie0477 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    actually vitamin d stores in the body unlike vitamin c that the body rids itself of the excess so be careful not to overdose. High doses are dangerous unless you are deficient. That's for people, not sure how it relates to chickens
     
  6. schnebbles

    schnebbles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ok -I'll put their electrolytes/vitamins back in the water along with the superB.
     
  7. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    Sorry-- I haven't been around much to help, but PLEASE be careful not to overdose vitamin D in birds! THIS IS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT FOR CHICKENS as we often give them calcium-rich diets or at least supplement with calcium! Calcium + too much vit D = big problems!

    See this page... http://www.petmd.com/bird/conditions/digestive/c_bd_Vitamin_D_toxicosis

    Vitamin D is fat-soluble, meaning the body will accumulate it instead of eliminate the extra.

    Vitamin D deficiency is possible, but regulate supplementation very carefully, and do not freely supplement without measuring how much each bird is getting. What are you feeding them as their daily feed?
    http://www.poultrynews.com/New/Diseases/Merks/207019.htm
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. CeeJ

    CeeJ Out Of The Brooder

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    Well the necropsy results are in. Coccidosis and no signs of anything else. I'm relieved, but not really. The day I took the one chick in, I got home and another chick was almost dead. She was running and playing when I left. Within 2 hours she was gone. Again, cocci. But I had treated them at 1 month old and again at 2 months. They were at the tail end of the second treatment. I used Cored 1/4 rounded teas per gallon for five days as their only water. The vet said it's very possible they have something else going on - bacterial infection perhaps - and we are waiting on one last set of tests to come in. But he said he's sure it isn't mareks. He also confirmed that cored was the best med to use as it treats against all 9 kinds, and that my dosing was correct. What he can't explain is how, after being treated twice, I've lost two. For now the other 9 look good. Good coloring, full crops and growing. I'm just confused now (like I wasn't before). He did say in rare cases after cocci tteatment, waiting 4 days then dosing again can break the cycle within the birds system. So, unless anyone here has any suggestions, that's what I'm planning on doing.

    This does not explain the tremors, paralysis and or vision problems That have been going on.

    I will keep all my birds just in case - even though I have an overabundance of roos. Gorgeous roos at that. I just don't have space for them all to grow out. They are already fiesty little boogers. I wouldn't want to ever possibly infect someone else's coop. What to do?

    One more note. Though I question this particular vet's expertise with chickens, he said even if vaccinated for mareks, a necropsy would easily reveal if that's what they have. He said the vaccine only interferes with blood tests, not a necropsy.

    For no apparent reason, I totally scrubbed clean my 2 coops even though I just did that 2 weeks ago. It took 7 hours of hard scrubbing. I can't afford the oxine and have no where for the chickens to stay if I were to clorox, but I did what I could. Good old fashioned soap, followed by vinegar.

    A whole 24 hours and no one else showing any problems. Here's hoping the worst is over.
     
  9. BigECarter

    BigECarter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    1/4 tsp doesn't sound right. 1/2 to 3/4 level is what I remember.
     
  10. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    Not right to me either. I've heard this 1/4 tsp dose as well, and always thought it was a teaspoon per gallon. And there's a smaller dose as a preventative.
     

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