NPIP Certification

Discussion in 'Local Chicken Laws & Ordinances' started by horsechick, Feb 2, 2009.

  1. VillaRosaAcres

    VillaRosaAcres In the Brooder

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    I wil probably never become Npip certified as I do not want to be limited to what birds I can get. For me it would be a waste of time and money, as I have a tendency to purchase on impulse and would not be able to pass on a healthy bird from an untested flock.
     
  2. MSchick89

    MSchick89 Hatching

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    I'll be glad to help with information regarding NPIP Testing. If you would send me your full name, address, and phone number we will add you to our testing list. We are currently a little behind on our testing. We are just now starting on the January list, so depending on the area you are in it could be a few weeks before we get to you.

    Once you are on the list we will contact you when we are in your area to set up the best time to do the testing. We test on Monday-Friday and our working hours are 8:00 am -5:00 pm. To do the testing we do ask that there be someone there to assist in catching and holding birds for the tester. If you are doing strictly backyard birds for your own use we will test around 10-15 birds. If you plan to do out of state shipping/showing we will need to test at least 30 birds, or if you have less than 30 we test all birds over 5 months of age.

    The once a year testing is free and will include PT (Pullorum & Fowl Typhoid) testing, which is a blood sample from the wing, and H5/H7 AI (Avian Influenza) testing, which is a swab of the mouth. Birds must be at least 5 months old to be tested. If your birds are not 5 months old call or email us when they are and we will add you to the list at that time.

    Please let us know in advance if you will be doing out of state shipping and/or showing of birds and/or hatching eggs because there is other information that we require for that process. Also, if you need an Egg Permit because you plan to sell eggs at farmers markets or sell more than 6 dozen eggs a week let us know. We will do the Egg Inspection for the Department of Agriculture when we are there and give you the contact information for permits.

    I have information below about the three different Mississippi testing programs. Please let us know which program would best fit for you.

    Mississippi PT Program - Test 10-15 birds for PT & AI once a year, Birds are legal to be transported or shipped in Mississippi Only, Open flock where birds can be bought, sold, traded to anyone, and Eggs can be sold at Farmers Markets with proper permits from the Mississippi Department of Agriculture

    National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP) - Test 10-15 birds for PT & AI once a year, Birds are legal to be transported or shipped in Mississippi Only, Closed flock where birds can only be bought from other NPIP members, Birds can be sold to anyone, and Eggs can be sold at Farmers Markets with proper permits from the Mississippi Department of Agriculture

    National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP) AI H5/H7 Clean - Test 30 birds for PT & AI twice a year, Birds are legal to be shipped nation wide with 9-3 Forms and proper state import permits/requirements, Closed flock where birds can only be bought from other NPIP members, Birds can be sold to anyone, and Eggs can be sold at Farmers Markets with proper permits from the Mississippi Department of Agriculture

    If you have any questions you can reach my by email or at 601-540-0174 or Jeff Vance the NPIP Tester/Poultry Epidemiologist at 601-540-5937 / [email protected].



    Thanks,
    Megan
    -------------------------------------------------
    Megan White
    Poultry Epidemiologist
    Mississippi Board of Animal Health
    PO Box 18920
    Hattiesburg, MS 39404
    601-540-0174
     
  3. KatieWyant

    KatieWyant Hatching

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    Apr 24, 2017
    My Fair says you have to have the NPIP Papers when you entry. Helpp PLz
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Free Ranging

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    Different states have different requirements. Different shows and different fairs have different requirements. My first suggestion is to find out what the specific requirements are for the show you are planning to enter. If you can, find out who is in charge and talk to them. Your extension agent may be a good resource to help you find out who that is.

    One of the questions you should ask is where to get the inspection. Sometimes shows have people at the fair to do those tests when you first bring the birds. Sometimes there are individuals licensed to do those tests that live in your community. That type of question should be really common for the people running the show, they should be able to give you a good answer and some help.

    The requirements could be different from one county fair to another county fair, let alone state fair by state fair. The best people to talk to about one specific show is the people running that specific show.

    Good luck!
     
  5. Tlmcq

    Tlmcq Songster

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    Pomeroy, OH
    If you go to APA website you can find a tester in your area...pretty simple in Ohio. The tester comes out tests your birds and if clean you get your certificate. Tester will tell you what they charge to come out and test. It cost me $25. You can get certified to test and test others birds by taking class in Columbus they do it in Spring. Ohio doesn't allow testing of your own flock for certification tho.
     
  6. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Free Ranging

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    In Missouri, there is one tester statewide for non large sale flocks. But it is free for the basic PT test.
     
  7. BroodyHuman

    BroodyHuman Songster

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    Poplarville, Ms
    I'm sorry to be a bother, but is there a checklist that one can begin adhering to before being tested. Maybe a program outline to maintain in order to meet npip requirements.

    We are in Poplarville, Ms and would like to start getting ready for NPIP Certification now so that we will be ready to sell in the late summer / early fall.

    Thank you in advance. Sending positive vibes from the Conner family.
     
  8. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Free Ranging

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    There really isn't anything to do but get on the schedule. Sometimes they have a backlog of 3 months or more.
    You can arrange your setup to catch your adult birds so it will be easier when the tester arrives. It only takes a few seconds per bird.
    Other than that, either your birds have blood antibodies for Pullorum/Typhoid or they don't.
     
  9. BroodyHuman

    BroodyHuman Songster

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    Oct 11, 2018
    Poplarville, Ms
    I found some texts from the Mississippi Board of Animal Health that mention incubator and hatcher health, brooder/hatcher separation, good good storage, environment cleanliness and a few other things that are "supposed to be" checked.

    I know they are a different entity, but these things aren't checked by NPIP, as well?

    I guess I'm just paranoid and want to make sure I get everything right.

    Thanks in advance. Sending positive vibes.
     
  10. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Crowing

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    Each state has varying requirements they like to tag onto the actual national testing program. For instance my state in last year suddenly wanted to look at my incubator, inspect my coop to see that it was clean and had me sign something that within declared I would wash any eggs I sold. Washing eggs for sale in Vermont is not a requirement. I asked the inspector if I could cross that part out before signing. They said no, I signed and told him I will never wash my eggs. If done improperly promotes bacterial infection.

    So, in a nutshell, keep a clean coop and make sure you wash out your incubator just in case you have a nosey inspection program in your state. Have a plan to contain the birds for inspection. This last one is important. If your birds are out roaming, they will not aid you in catching them and will leave as you were not prepared and wasting their time.

    I keep birds in coop and grab one at a time for inspection right outside the coop then let it go and grab another. I have a fold out table set up for inspector before they arrive and schedule them to come in morning as birds are cooped awaiting them to arrive.

    If your inspection is in cold month you have to have a warm place to conduct the test. My inspection was December this past year so turned heat on in garage and made trips with birds in a large dog kennel. Three trips, he didn't mind, only took an extra 15 minutes to walk back and forth to coop grabbing more birds.
     

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