Nuheart Heartworm prevention. Does anyone use it? Advice wanted!

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by 4-H chicken mom, Jun 7, 2010.

  1. 4-H chicken mom

    4-H chicken mom Overrun With Chickens

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    I used my last doses of Heartguard on my two 58 & 63 lb Weimaraners. I called my vet and was told I have to have the heartworm test before I can get any more. Which to me is just a waste of money, so now I am looking elsewhere. I came across this site that sells a Generic version of Heartguard at 1/2 the price I am paying for the brand name. Shipping is $5 or they have other discounts if you are a frequent buyer.

    http://www.petcarechoice.com/index....play/pn/Nuheart.Heartworm/product_id/9324.htm
    Does anyone here use it? Or is there something else I can use? [​IMG]
     
  2. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    Interesting! I would also love to hear what others think.

    It does have the exact same ingredients as the regular Heartguard.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2010
  3. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Why is the heartworm test necessary? Has there been a lapse in administering it? If you keep the dogs on it full time, they shouldn't need the test at all, at least that's what our vet told me. As long as you start it by age 6 months and use it faithfully, no need for the test.
    I think even ordering it online you still need to submit a prescription from the vet. I could be wrong.

    We use iverhart plus, that we get from the vet. It's ivermectin and pyrantel (for ascarid and hookworms). We pay $24 a box for Jax's, so that's the 51 - 100 lb. box (six doses).
     
  4. Rin

    Rin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I wonder why heart worm medication requires a vet - yet you can get medication for any other parasite without a script no problem. I guess to make sure proper tests are done before being put on a routine of it... but then after that it should be more accessible. Like, just require a copy of their medical records to show they were put on it. Like, my dog farrah had her tests before I got her and was on the meds ever since. Maybe its so people /have/ to return once a year for their checkup... but still.. unless I bought two boxes while there I'd hafta come back for more every 6 months - which is excessive imho and for general pet population it puts owners in a position where they're far less likely to keep their pets on this life-saving regimen which is a loss for all involved. [​IMG]
     
  5. 4-H chicken mom

    4-H chicken mom Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:That's why I am having a problem with this test. My dogs have been on it faithfully 12 months a yr. since they were 5 months old.
    There are some places that don't require a script, something my vet won't even write anymore so we could get it elsewere. I guess he found out he could make more money if you have to buy it from him.

    gritsar, you are getting a deal with yours. Mine will cost me $42 for 6 doses or $80 for 12 doses. That's why I am looking into this generic stuff.
     
  6. Godsgrl

    Godsgrl Ostrich wrangler

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    There is a heartworm shot you can get, that is only $15.00. You probably still have to get the test, but it would be cheaper in the long run than doing the heartgard.
     
  7. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    I give the Ivomectrian in the mouth..as long as your dog doesn't have a reaction to Heart guard. It is the same stuff, just lacks the wormer in it. A big bottle is very cheap and lasts a long time even with 4 big dogs, and I can always use some on the chickens and the cow... [​IMG]
     
  8. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:My understanding is that you need to have them tested for heartworms before starting the preventative or the dog has to be under six months old. The reason being, if a dog has heartworm disease already and you dose them with the preventive, there can be serious consequences.
    My vet doesn't require a visit just to get the preventive, if the dog(s) are already taking it. Once Jax and the kittys get their rabies this month, which we will have done at the vet instead of the rabies clinic because we prefer it that way, they will all be done for a year. Then we won't need to visit the vet again until Kane is due for his yearly rabies in April, 2011. We'll just stop by and pick up some iverhart as needed.
    We've never had to spend more than $125 at our vet and that's taking both dogs and both cats in, including their meds.
    ETA: Something else I just thought of. If you do decide to try this product nuheart, be sure and verify that its obtained from US sources. The dosing and/or ingredients isn't always correct in foreign products (read:China). What a tragedy it would be to lose a beautiful dog that you thought was protected, only to find out the medication was worthless.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2010
    1 person likes this.
  9. Kansaseq

    Kansaseq Prairie Wolf Farm Asylum

    Feb 12, 2009
    NE Kansas
    Quote:My understanding is that you need to have them tested for heartworms before starting the preventative or the dog has to be under six months old. The reason being, if a dog has heartworm disease already and you dose them with the preventive, there can be serious consequences.
    My vet doesn't require a visit just to get the preventive, if the dog(s) are already taking it. Once Jax and the kittys get their rabies this month, which we will have done at the vet instead of the rabies clinic because we prefer it that way, they will all be done for a year. Then we won't need to visit the vet again until Kane is due for his yearly rabies in April, 2011. We'll just stop by and pick up some iverhart as needed.
    We've never had to spend more than $125 at our vet and that's taking both dogs and both cats in, including their meds.
    ETA: Something else I just thought of. If you do decide to try this product nuheart, be sure and verify that its obtained from US sources. The dosing and/or ingredients isn't always correct in foreign products (read:China). What a tragedy it would be to lose a beautiful dog that you thought was protected, only to find out the medication was worthless.

    Yes. If by chance you missed a few months or your dog, unbeknownst to you, puked up the pill behind the sofa a few months in a row (unlikely, I know) and your dog DOES have heartworms, and you give the pill, there can be a massive die off of worms that could kill your dog. The vets are covering their butts, as well as trying to be as safe as possible with your dog.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. chickerdoodle

    chickerdoodle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 21, 2009
    Oregon
    The test is not 100% accurate nor the preventatives 100% effective. If by chance your pet does have a small load of heartworms and you give the medication (or change the type of preventative you were using) you can get some of the parasites dying off and clogging the small blood vessels in the kidneys and possibly kill the dog. It also takes several months for the parasites to mature and produce young microfilaria that causes the clogging (large adult heartworms dying can clog the heart and major arteries). Realistically, if they stay on the same drug and you always give it at the proper time a test every two years may be sufficient. In a known area that has a high percentage of heartworms in the population I would do the test annually or at least bi-annually.
     

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