Nuheart Heartworm prevention. Does anyone use it? Advice wanted!

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by 4-H chicken mom, Jun 7, 2010.

  1. Jaguaress

    Jaguaress Chicken Addict Wanna-be

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  2. Rin

    Rin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:unfortunately they do. I found this out with a past dog and my vet refused to give them an RX claiming he wasn't a patient even though he was and they told me to put him on heart worm :x
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2010
  3. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    Yes just about all vet require you to see them before putting them on heartworm prevention. I had my cat on expensive heartworm and flea program and now, I just need the script. The vet wont do it without the tests and visits being done which it will cost me $150 dollars total and including the 6 doses for the program cost me another $150 which I can get it cheaper elsewhere. Like any other RX and doctor's, the vets and RX does the same thing, it will cost you more money.

    So I vaccinated the cat myself without rabies shots and forego the heartworm meds and just get the flea program even we are negative but can not take any chances of anyone bringing it in my home. We are not alone in this. I used to have a wonderful vet when we lived on the farm, he would write up scripts in anything we need. Now we can not at all, despite of four different vets...all wanted to see the cat first and have blood drawn before giving me their expensive RX, no scripts at all.

    They also do not let you see your cat being vaccinated or popping something down in them. They just take the animal into another room and do it. Something tells me that they do not want people to self medicate their animals. I think the "reaction from the owners would affect their animals' well being" is a bunch of baloney!

    Bottom point...........its all about $$$$$$$$$$$$!
     
  4. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    I use TriHeart Plus for both the pups. [​IMG] Cheaper than Heartguard Plus.
     
  5. Kansaseq

    Kansaseq Prairie Wolf Farm Asylum

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    "I think the "reaction from the owners would affect their animals' well being" is a bunch of baloney!"


    Actually, it's not.
    This is to prevent the owner and vet / tech from being bitten.The animals are not as likely to be protective/nervous if their owner is not in the room. As an assistant for 9yrs, and now rvt of 10 yrs, I've done it both ways. They ARE better away from the owner. And trust me, I get paid the same hourly rate either way I do it, so the only incentive is not getting hurt.
    And you'd be surprised how many owners will put their faces or even hands in front of a dog's face when it's snarling and trying to bite. Or tell the dog "It's ok", when it's trying to bite us.
    I once had a lhasa latch onto my neck, and the owner kept saying" Be careful of his left leg. It hurts." Hello! Your dog has it's teeth in my neck!
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2010
  6. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    The best treatment is a couple of drops of 1% Ivomec every month.
    It's cheap, doesn't need a prescription and has a long shelf life

    It shouldn't be used on herding breeds
     
  7. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    I use Enforcer. Works great!
     
  8. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    Quote:That, I can understand if the animal is unwilling.

    It is the emotional part, if the owner gets emotional or fearful of seeing a vet giving her dog a shot, the dog can read her face expression that the shot is going to HURT. Like we watch our kids get the shots, they would cry and we cry too.

    In my case, there was no need to remove the animal including a chicken to be looked over. Some of us have been vet tech ourselves and we do know the restraints. Even I have informed the vet that I was a pre-vet student with basic veterinarian care including stitches, repairing and banaging wounds was the common thing in our vet classes. I am familiar with the restraints as well but they snubbed me. Well needless to say, they got bitten LOL! Yep all part of the territory!

    However, they can ask the owner to step away from the table to stand next to the wall or sit in the chair while they perform the services. I'd prefer it that way so I will know what they are doing and no unexpected surprises like another RX or vaccination they didn't tell me about. I like to observe what I am paying for when they tell me what my pet needs ahead of time. After all we are customers and we have that right to know what the vet is servicing or rendering the services on my pet, not something hokey pokey that later I would find out that they gave another shot uninformed and slap that charge on my bill. That is the problem that is so common in our area.
     
  9. chickerdoodle

    chickerdoodle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 21, 2009
    Oregon
    Quote:Absolutely correct. I was a certified veterinary technician for many year prior to becoming an animal behaviorist . There certainly are some clients and pets that would be fine but too many times clients and staff get hurt. Imagine getting getting a scratch or bite every day at work knowing it could have been easily prevented (they already know it'll happen once in a while but OSHA does oversee them as well).

    Veterinarians DO want clients to know how to properly medicate in case the pet needs medications at home (antibiotics, etc.). I can't count how many times clients insisted their pet didn't get better (and that the vet wasn't helpful) since they gave every pill--only to go home and move the couch and count a week's worth of tablets. There are laws that govern prescriptions and veterinarians MUST abide by them just like your own physician--or lose their license. [​IMG]
     
  10. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    I find this really interesting. Our vet just sells it out of his office, no prescription needed. He doesn't test them for heartworms unless we ask him to. It's $25 for the testing. You CAN use Heartgard in your dog has heartworms. It will not hurt your dog. The medicine is in small enough doses that the adults are killed gradually. When they eggs hatch, and grow, they will be killed by the medicine. It's a VERY gradual process, not like the $500 treatment that kills instantly.
     

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