one weakness of at least some game cameras

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by jmc, Jan 11, 2012.

  1. jmc

    jmc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 22, 2008
    South Central MA
    the length of time it takes the motion detector to make the cam shutter trip.

    let me explain:

    if your target animal is moving at a +/- 90 angle to your camera's detection range, it may very well happen--maybe alot--that you will get pictures of NOTHING at all, just nice scenery, but no 'critter'.

    Why? Because the critter moving at a right angle to the detection range was already out of the field of view by the time the motion sensor detected it, and sent the message to the cam. shutter to 'take a pic!'

    This could be more of a problem, the closer to the camera the 'critter' is. At further distances, you may get the critter in the picture, but due to the time it takes the motion sensor to get the message to the cam shutter to 'take that pic!', you may only get the critter just before it passes out of range, OR only part of the critter.....

    It seems that at least some game cams will get more pics of critters if the path of the critter is at some oblique angle to the detection range of the camera. Another way of saying this all, could be:

    If your camera is at a 90 deg. angle to the path you think critters are taking, you might get less 'empty pics' if you put the camera facing at some angle 'down' or 'up' the trail........................

    so panel of experts, whaddya hafta say?

    at least for some cameras this seems to be the case for sure........
     
  2. The Lazy L

    The Lazy L Chillin' With My Peeps

    739
    64
    148
    Dec 16, 2011
    1868
    You are are correct.

    Coworker has his set to snap 3 pictures when triggered. At right angles first 2 pictures are of nothing and the 3rd you can see him just leaving the picture frame.

    Some of the newest Trail cams have address this by having a wider detect sensor angle then the lens angle.
     
  3. jmc

    jmc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 22, 2008
    South Central MA
    thanks for the reply. interesting what you say about some of the newest trail cams 'remedy'. what kind of cam might your coworker have, if i may ask?
     
  4. fishman65

    fishman65 Chillin' With My Peeps

    479
    3
    131
    Apr 18, 2009
    flat rock
    instead of taking 3 or 6 shot burst(pics) set the camera on AVI setting and get videos that play on your pc. they are usually 15-30-45 sec videos of whatever is in front of the camera. just remember to double your memory chip size.
     
  5. The Lazy L

    The Lazy L Chillin' With My Peeps

    739
    64
    148
    Dec 16, 2011
    1868

    Bushnell. I don't know what model.
     
  6. moetrout

    moetrout Chillin' With My Peeps

    842
    32
    153
    May 5, 2010
    Milan, MI
    I have a Bushnell Trophy cam and what you say is true. However since you already know that just setup your camera correctly so the expected entrance/exit of the animal you are expecting is in line with the camera and not perpendicular. This is what I do and it works!
     
  7. jmc

    jmc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 22, 2008
    South Central MA
    great to have your corroboration, moe!

    and fishman, may i ask what kind of cam you have?
     
  8. jmc

    jmc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 22, 2008
    South Central MA
    on further thought, it seems this could only work if the 'critter' turned around and came back into the field of vision of the lens. Otherwise, due to the lag time between motion detection (see above) and shutter-tripping, you would probably end up--at best--with a video of 'something' going out of the field of view, followed by several seconds of 'videoed scenery'

    ya folla?
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by