Please help! How to treat "scald" on chickens' feet?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by AlieaMikel, Jan 31, 2014.

  1. AlieaMikel

    AlieaMikel New Egg

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    Jun 1, 2013
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    New to chickens and new to the PacNW and we've got a big problem: after research online about why my four happy and healthy Buff Orps' feet started turning red yesterday, it appears they have "scald". This condition occurs because of wet bedding problems and the ammonia literally "burning" their skin.

    Well, we're pretty certain it's not the coop - we have that almost as dry as a bone due to deep, clean pine shavings, excellent ventilation, and mucking every other day. No smell at all. It must be the run - only a part of it is wet-wet but we're talking some days it holds 2+ inches of water. You'd think the hens would avoid it but they don't. Obviously, it's the low-lying area and that is where the manure drains and must be high in ammonia. That area is the culprit and we're getting a 1/2 ton of big pea gravel in there this weekend. So. PROBLEM solved hopefully, but how to treat the hens' feet? I heard they could be unable to walk (and therefore forage) very quickly, not to mention I hate them having discomfort.

    Anyone have experience or suggestions, please???
     
  2. realsis

    realsis Crazy for Silkies

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    Jan 17, 2013
    California
    I've read a bit about this condition and in my reading it is suggested to give the birds vitamin A to help with this issue. I hope this helps and wish you the best.
     
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  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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  4. tubateacher

    tubateacher Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 2, 2012
    Hi,

    How did you get on with the treatment of scald? I have discovered one of my bantams with it and need to sort it asap. I am wondering what the best and most effective method is ?

    Thanks
     
  5. AlieaMikel

    AlieaMikel New Egg

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    Jun 1, 2013
    Coupeville, WA
    We had to fix the run to finally alleviate the issue. They just can't forage in dirty, moist ground. We put down pea gravel and then pine shavings. The shavings got wet, naturally, but seemed to at least be a clean barrier to the ammonia from the manure-water. It cleared up entirely in less than 2 days after putting down the gravel and shavings! I considered Blu-Kote and would have sprayed them if the hens had picked at their feet; but I knew it would have been a bandaid and temporary solution.

    My advice is to figure out where the chicken is getting into an ammonia or other problem area and mitigate the area or barricade it ASAP. Best of luck to you, I know I hated seeing our girls distressed!
     

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