Poll: How many here have actually had bumblefoot in their poultry?

How many here have actually had bumblefoot in their poultry?

  • Had it -- couldn't successfully treat

    Votes: 6 8.7%
  • Had it -- have successfully treated in at least one bird

    Votes: 29 42.0%
  • Never had it

    Votes: 31 44.9%
  • What is bumblefoot?

    Votes: 3 4.3%

  • Total voters
    69

LaFleche

Crowing
8 Years
Sep 22, 2012
2,306
8,172
404
Germany
How big was the bumble? On my one hen it's about a quarter, but the other is about the size of a pencil eraser. After antibiotics it had shrunk to maybe the size of a pin head, but has since returned.
That would be because the reason that initiallly started the bumblefoot would be still in there, as there are often little stones they jumped on or a litlte splinter of glass, metal or wood or some thorns or spines while free ranging.
 

humblehillsfarm

Songster
Mar 27, 2020
1,581
2,547
183
Southwestern Pennsylvania
That would be because the reason that initiallly started the bumblefoot would be still in there, as there are often little stones they jumped on or a litlte splinter of glass, metal or wood or some thorns or spines while free ranging.
It seems unlikely considering the one had surgery for removal by a vet. She even allowed me to observe the surgery to snow she had removed both the kernel and all of the stingy bits and pus. Essentially as the foot healed, it became apparent very quickly that the original infection hadn’t cleared at all and the “scar” immediately formed a Bumblefoot scab over it. Both are large breeds prone to Bumblefoot due to their size, and I have implemented all of the recommended measures for comfortable roosts and soft landings. Regardless, I suppose there is always that chance but I will be giving both birds another attempt to clear things up in the next week or so.
 

Doggirl08

In the Brooder
Apr 21, 2020
68
43
43
I haven’t had it, but my uncle’s flock has. He has an ancient meat rooster, who they didn’t kill, and his feet are so swollen that he can’t walk.
 

OneHappyRooster

Crowing
Apr 5, 2020
4,805
8,830
363
This Side Of The Galaxy
None of mine have had any swelling whatsoever.
I bandaged the cockerels feet for months.
Every day I'd bathe his food and bandage it.
It didn't seem to help, so I eventually gave up with that as well. I don't actually know for sure it's bumblefoot, but I don't know what else it could be.

Most of mine are Orpingtons, so a pretty hefty breed. Maybe I should go in for a smaller breed next time.
 

Folly's place

Enabler
9 Years
Sep 13, 2011
21,317
32,370
1,036
southern Michigan
We've had chickens , usually twenty to forty minimum, for 27+ years, and had one bird with a very mild case that resolved.
Somewhere, years ago, I read or heard in a lecture that it can be related to diet. Can't remember exact details though. :oops:
So, related question; what's being fed out there?
We feed Flock Raiser, separate calcium, small amounts of scratch occasionally, and free range whatever.
Mary
 

OneHappyRooster

Crowing
Apr 5, 2020
4,805
8,830
363
This Side Of The Galaxy
I read or heard in a lecture that it can be related to diet. Can't remember exact details though. :oops:
So, related question; what's being fed out there?
That would be interesting. Mine don't have the best diet.
They eat layers pellets.
I hate feeding the roosters it, and even the hens, but I can't get growers or all flock easily where I live.
Mine also get a fair amount of scraps.
They free range, so they pick up grass, bugs ect.
It's not ideal though.
I have some younglings, so the cockerels have been getting some growers instead recently.
It would make sense if diet was involved.
 

LaFleche

Crowing
8 Years
Sep 22, 2012
2,306
8,172
404
Germany
My assumption after years of observation is that there are several prerequisites that promote bumble foot:

  • breed/genetical predisposition (Marans, Leghorn)
  • unbalanced diet/vitamin deficiencies (overweight)
  • height, shape and material of roosts and chicken ladder
  • type of bedding
  • soil conditions of the run (wet or sharp-edged little stones as vulcanic slag)
  • ground covering/vegetation (thorny, spiny)
  • individual kind of footpad (deeper crevices and folds near the toes)
 

fatcatx

Songster
7 Years
Apr 7, 2013
546
124
197
Northern California
I've had it with multiple birds and have yet to figure out what in my yard/coop is contributing to it.🙁 Mainly larger birds but a few light breeds as well. But now I've learned - I do complete feet examinations AT LEAST monthly. When I see it I treat it immediately. I wrap PRID on the spot for about a week or so and at that point the plug usually comes out. As a newbie I had two bad cases that required me to get the scalpel out. Hard on both me and the bird.🥺
Forgot to add: most cases did not reoccur. However a few birds were clearly prone to it because eventually it showed up in the other foot.
 

humblehillsfarm

Songster
Mar 27, 2020
1,581
2,547
183
Southwestern Pennsylvania
So, related question; what's being fed out there?
Up until March, I fed organic layer feed and supplemented with garden veggie scraps: carrot peels, squash (winter and summer), leftover corn cobs, lettuce, kale, etc. My neighbor formulates feed for meat birds for a nearby university and started giving me that for free and it is roughly the equivalent of all-flock feed. It is 20% protein and I provide egg shells and oyster shells free choice. I'm happier with this thus far because I do have roosters, babies, and a current broody mama sitting on eggs. The bumble occurred long before that switch though so I can't say anything definitive about the feed contributing to the bumblefoot.

My assumption after years of observation is that there are several prerequisites that promote bumble foot:
  • breed/genetical predisposition: The two affected breeds a brahma and a (On the larger side for her breed) welsummer
  • unbalanced diet/vitamin deficiencies: Both hens are laying but I cannot speak for whether or not they are a healthy weight
  • height, shape and material of roosts and chicken ladder: roost is about 18" off the floor and covered with a pool noodle.
  • type of bedding: Litter is 4" of coffee grounds, but bumblefoot in one hen began when I was using pine shavings, and the other hen developed probably around the time I first started using coffee grounds
  • soil conditions of the run (wet or sharp-edged little stones as volcanic slag): They are free ranged in a yard that is about 1 acre large with well-maintained grass, and about 3 acres of available woods. There is *some* surface coal chunks
  • ground covering/vegetation (thorny, spiny): in the woods there's always the chance for thorns, so cannot rule that out
  • individual kind of footpad (deeper crevices and folds near the toes): foot pads are otherwise normal
On another note: bumblefoot is a type of staph infection, and this can be transmitted via feces, dirt, or other infected hens through a small scrape, and not necessarily caused by an inbedded object, from what I understand by the vet. This is in addition to blunt force impact such as jumping from roosts, which is why heavy breeds are more susceptible.
 

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