Prairie Bluebell Breeding produces what color egg layer?

TayInTX

Chirping
May 14, 2019
40
46
51
I’ve been wanting some prairie bluebells and wanting the ability to produce blue egg layers myself. I asked Hoover hatchery if crossing a prairie bluebell rooster and a prairie bluebell hen would result in offspring that lays blue eggs. They replied that they do not breed true. (This is obvious - look at the color variation) but they did not answer my specific question about what color egg the offspring would likely lay.

By my (poor) genetic calculations, this cross should produce some hens who lay a blue egg and some who *might* lay white. Has anyone done this breeding? Any geneticists already know the outcome from this type of cross?

If Hoover’s is selling Starlight hens, which come from a Prairie Bluebell/Brown layer cross and mostly produce a green egg laying offspring, that tells me the blue gene should be readily passed on.
Thus a PBxPB should produce some blue egg layers.

Thank you everyone for any help you can give!
 

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
26,762
18,602
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Southeast Louisiana
The Prairie Bluebell is a marketing name for Hoover's leghorn/araucana cross. So it is a hybrid.

The hens and roosters each have one blue egg shell gene and one not-blue shell gene. The not-blue gene default color is white because of other genetics. The blue egg shell gene is dominant so the hens will lay a blue egg.

Since the egg shell color genes are randomly passed down from both mother and father, about 1/4 of the pullet offspring of a PB rooster over PB hen will lay white eggs. About 3/4 of the pullets will lay blue eggs. The male offspring will not lay eggs so you don't know what genetics they inherited.

The Araucana tuft gene is potentially fatal gene. It is dominant so if the Araucana has one tuft gene it will have tufts. If it has two copies of the tuft gene the chick will die before hatching. If it does not have any tuft genes then it will not have any effect. So some of your PB should have tufts, some probably do not. If you cross two PB with tufts about 1/4 will die before hatch, about half will have tufts, ad about 1/4 will not have tufts.

If you cross a PB that has tufts with a PB that does not have tufts none will die from that fatal gene, about half should have tufts, and about 1/2 will not.

Hopefully that is clear. If not, let me know.
 
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TayInTX

Chirping
May 14, 2019
40
46
51
That was a phenomenal answer and was exactly what I was hoping to learn! THANK YOU SO MUCH! I didn’t know the tuft gene was fatal - I’m grateful you shared that. Thank you!
 

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