Question on Thomas Pharr's chicken coop article

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by The French Hen, Jul 31, 2010.

  1. The French Hen

    The French Hen Tres Chic

    82
    0
    29
    Jul 31, 2010
    Tarpon Springs, FL
    In his article he states that he used fiberglass greenhouse cover....that's the green roof...I have seen that stuff before but I don't know what it's offcially called...I have checked Lowes and Homedepot and a bunch of other places and googled and nothing I am not finding it. Can he tell us where he got it and what it is actually called ?

    Thanks
    Pat
    Tarpon Springs, FL
     
  2. ekemily

    ekemily Chillin' With My Peeps

    488
    0
    119
    Mar 8, 2010
    Fairhope, AL
  3. beth59

    beth59 Out Of The Brooder

    88
    0
    29
    Jul 2, 2009
    Pensacola, Fl
    Our Lowes in P'Cola has a corrugated polycarbonate roofing. Think they have it in green. We were looking at it last year to redo our greenhouse with.

    Beth
     
  4. The French Hen

    The French Hen Tres Chic

    82
    0
    29
    Jul 31, 2010
    Tarpon Springs, FL
    Thanks ekemily...........that's exactly it and it was at sears of all places.

    Thanks a bunch......................

    Your the next best thing since toilet paper !!! yipeee.,, LOL
     
  5. ekemily

    ekemily Chillin' With My Peeps

    488
    0
    119
    Mar 8, 2010
    Fairhope, AL
    Quote:Glad I could help! [​IMG]
    and [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  6. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,520
    144
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    I am not sure corrugated *fiberglass* roofing panels are even manufactured anymore (anyhow I tried real hard to find some about 5 years ago and came up entirely dry). Their substitute these days are the pvc and polycarbonate plastic corrugated roofing panels that are sold at Home Depot and anywhere else like that. READ THE WARRANTY INFO before choosing between the cheaper pvc and the pricier polycarbonate -- the cheaper stuff is not durable for very cold or very hot temperatures and carries no hail warranty.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  7. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,852
    52
    249
    May 23, 2009
    DFW
    I used the polycarb roofing ...SunTuff I think it was called...on my small winter coop. I don't like it. The inside of the coop heats up dreadfully during the day so it's bad for summer, but when the sun goes down the heat inside the coop dissipates quickly, so that's bad for winter. The new coop I'm having built will have a conventional shingled roof with insulation.
     
  8. The French Hen

    The French Hen Tres Chic

    82
    0
    29
    Jul 31, 2010
    Tarpon Springs, FL
    Thanks for all the responses...

    If the heat and cold is an issue because of the roof I may need to re-think that one....I was just trying to go for cheap !!!

    Thanks a bunch...

    Pat
     
  9. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    When I built my second coop, I used that heat-reflective plywood stuff, with the shiny side UP (not down, facing into the coop) and then I put white Ondura 'corrugated' roof panels over that. The white helps reflect heat, too.

    I may be kidding myself, but I do think the coop stays a bit cooler than it might have, otherwise. On 102 degree days, the coop temp has been 92... of course, the chickens are ranging freely anyway, but at least it takes less time to cool off in the evenings than if it had gotten hotter during the day.
     
  10. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,852
    52
    249
    May 23, 2009
    DFW
    Quote:It depends on what you're trying to achieve with your roofing. I wasn't planning on using this coop in the summer, just in the winter. I have very small bantams that are part Serama, a breed not known for cold tolerance. I was trying to build a coop that would retain some of the heat from the day on into the night. For this purpose, the polycarbonate roofing didn't work for me.

    I have the smoked polycarbonate roofing on my summer coop/run. It's open sided, so it doesn't get noticeably hotter than the ambient temperature. The polycarb roofing was light, easy to apply, and certainly keeps the inside of the coop/run dry when it rains. It serves my purpose for this coop/run.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by