Question regarding what issue to treat first before another chick dies

Nksg75

Songster
6 Years
Aug 18, 2014
973
1,038
221
Needville Texas
Hi,
I have a question regarding what to treat for first.
Little background regarding my flock:
I have a mixed aged flock, (9) adult laying hens, (15) 4 month old pullets, (4, now 3) broody raised chicks by 2 different broodys, and a lone rooster!
The chicks have always been raised amongst the flock, and seem to be healthier because of it! (I have some very good silkies who will protect their babies from other hens, and a wonderful rooster who helps)

I just had a broody raised chick (9 weeks old) die. I knoticed something was wrong with this chick mid afternoon as everyone was free ranging. I actually took the time to stop what I doing and just sit and watch chicken tv! I immediately knoticed this chick sort of slow, just looking miserable. I tried to catch it and couldn't, so instead of making it worse, I left it alone for awhile and just observed.
When I was finally able to catch it, it shocked me how very thin this poor baby was. Skin and bone.
I separated it, and fed it a enormous amount of mealworms. This poor chick ate like crazy. It was getting later, and I struggled over what to do as far as medical care for this baby.
It had obviously had an appetite, as it gobbled the mealworms like crazy, and I always see it at the 6 different feeders I have out for the flock. I knew after the mealworms I needed to make sure it drank. I took it over and just held her in my hand in front of the waterer. She drank quite a bit.
It was getting late and she seemed to be getting sleepier as evening came. I had to get the flock in for the evening, so I separated her in a crate with food and water inside the coop with her mom.
After everyone was in safely for the night, I went back and felt bad for the chick who still really wanted to be with momma hen.
I took her out and placed her with her mom, and chickmates. She immediately took comfort with momma hen, and I decided to leave them for the night and do reasearch on what to do for her.
Needles to say, she was dead in the morning. She was still in the nestbox with mom and other chicks when I got up at the crack of dawn to check on her.
The other chicks raised by her are still active and foraging just fine.
One thing I did notice after the chicks death is that another one of the chicks poop had worms. Quite a few of the little small worms. They were very knoticable. I need to worm the whole flock, (as they have never been wormed before). However I am wondering why this chick died. Was it possible coccidios?
If so I know it is best to take care of the coccidios first, then worry about the worms.
Here is what I found with the chick that died. I feel bad for not knoticing this chick earlier, however being broody raised it wasn't as friendly as the chicks I raised myself.
It was skin and bones, weak, sluggish, sleepy as the day went on.
I have valbezen for the worms and sulmet for coccidios.
The other chicks have worms, I do know that.
The adults are their normal self.
I really don't know if it died from an overload of worms, or possibly coccidios.
Need advice please.
 

PD-Riverman

Crowing
8 Years
Jan 14, 2012
5,007
1,302
406
Conway SC
If it was skin and Bones it is probably eat up with worms plus you said you seen them too. How are the rest of the chicks, the flock? Boney too?? I would worm them asap.
 
Last edited:

Wyorp Rock

🐓 ❤ 🐛
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Sep 20, 2015
37,444
52,905
1,332
Southern N.C. Mountains
I it was skin and Bones it is probably eat up with worms plus you said you seen them too. How are the rest of the chicks, the flock? Boney too?? I would worm them asap.

Agreed, if you are seeing worms then worming would be your first course of action imho.

It's possible that you could be dealing with Cocci as well. Symptoms of worm overload and cocci can have a cross-over (look similar).

If you have a vet, having a fecal float performed on a fresh poop sample would be ideal. This will give you better info on Cocci loads as well as what type of worms you have.

If you have access to Corid to treat Cocci, it may not be a bad idea to treat them for Cocci as you treat with the Valbazen. Sulmet is good for Cocci, but only treats a few strains and is more harsh on the system.

After you finish worming and/or treating for Cocci, offer poultry vitamins and probiotics/yogurt for several days afterward.
 

Nksg75

Songster
6 Years
Aug 18, 2014
973
1,038
221
Needville Texas
Thanks for the advice. I originally meant I had corrid, I do also have sulmet.
So it is ok to treat with corrid and valbezen at the same time?
The others seem fine as far as weight goes. I have not noticed any significant weight loss in the others. I will take another look today.
 

Wyorp Rock

🐓 ❤ 🐛
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Sep 20, 2015
37,444
52,905
1,332
Southern N.C. Mountains
Thanks for the advice. I originally meant I had corrid, I do also have sulmet.
So it is ok to treat with corrid and valbezen at the same time?
The others seem fine as far as weight goes. I have not noticed any significant weight loss in the others. I will take another look today.

I don't see where Corid and Valbazen would contradict one another. Corid would be in the water and is a Coccidiostat, where the Valbazen is an anthelmintic that you would administer orally once, then repeat in 10days.

If your other chicks seem fine - no symptoms of lethargy, loss of balance, going off feed, etc., then you may want to just de-worm and see how it goes. But if you are seeing physical worms, then I would treat them.
 

Nksg75

Songster
6 Years
Aug 18, 2014
973
1,038
221
Needville Texas
Ok, I was just thinking it may be hard on their systems to do both at once. I am leaning more towards it being worms rather than coccidios.
Now I have to look up dosage for them.
Then comes the fun part, doing each and everyone individually!!
At least it takes the guesswork out of the equation by doing it to each and every bird.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom