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Refurbishing and Upcycling Furniture

Discussion in 'Hobbies' started by happytxchick, Jan 2, 2016.

  1. happytxchick

    happytxchick Egg Song Acre

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    Jul 8, 2009
    Sulphur Springs, TX
    I've been refurbishing old furniture since 2012 when I sold my flock and moved into a neighborhood. I'm about to get a few chickens again, but plan to keep refurbishing. Who else enjoys this hobby, and what's your favorite method?

    I prefer chalk paint and I make my own. Here is a the dresser of a bedroom set I did for a friend's nursery:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2016
  2. RedBanks

    RedBanks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 18, 2015
    What is your recipe for chalk paint? The dresser is very nice. Great Job![​IMG]
     
  3. Ole and Lena

    Ole and Lena Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 22, 2011
    Wright Co Minnesota
    I get a lot of spare time in the winter and do a lot of work on gunstocks, occasionally a small furniture piece.

    I like to find oddball gunstocks at shows in serviceable condition, then research the model, sand, repair and refinish them to showroom new or better. Some of them for rare, high end models will fetch a premium price but you need to know what to look for.

    Sometimes I find a dud... either can't identify model or it doesn't sell, but usually I do quite well. Stocks for the early Winchesters and the early Remington slide and semi-autos are especially in demand and can often be had for a song at shows if you can spot them.

    Lately I've been working with more new wood or refinishing stocks on existing guns for friends and acquaintances. I use exclusively oil finish. Traditional sanding down to rottenstone and finish with bone black and a mixture of boiled Linseed, tung, teak oils and turpentine, depending on wood type and porosity.

    A gunstock finish is also extremely attractive on walnut or cherry furniture. On pines and light woods, I've used a pine-tar rub followed by BLO/turpentine for a slightly carbonized, aged, very soft look on new unpainted furniture and flooring.
     

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