Replacing chickens

Foxinthehenhouse

Songster
Aug 7, 2019
196
359
126
Cruso, NC
Unfortunately I had to euthanize all my chickens several months ago. They had contracted MG and several other very contagious disease. They could not figure out how they got it. It broke my heart. I had a mix of twelve hens and one gorgeous BCM rooster. I’m going to get chicks in March and start over. I want a mixture of colored eggs, friendly hens and best layers. I’m looking at buff Orphington, golden laced Wyandotte’s, Welsummers, olive edgers,steel eggers, Easter eggers & BCMs. If you were only getting 8 pullets what would you get?
 

Cryss

Eggcentric
Premium Feather Member
Nov 12, 2017
4,664
11,580
797
Northwest New Jersey
I have Buff orpington, SLW ( almost same color egg as my BO), BCM, EE, OE, Leghorn, Legbar. So light brown, dark brown, chocolate brown, green, olive, white, and blue. Also have BWA for a small blue egg and 55 Flower for white. That’s basically 7 colors.
 

Allthefloofs

Songster
Sep 16, 2020
607
1,465
216
Scottsdale, AZ
Super blue layer (blue), Buff Orpington (lt brown), Delaware (dk brown/speckles), Olive egger (BCM over CCL), EE (green), Mottled Houdan (white), BCM (chocolate brown), Brahma (lt brown) because they are sweet, Salmon Faverolle (lt brn) because they have a good rep for being sweet and silly. If I lived in a place where things didn't incinerate on contact in the summer this is the flock I would build. Have a great time picking your new flock!
 

CHlCKEN

🍂 Chicken Herder 🍂
Premium Feather Member
Jun 21, 2020
15,522
84,518
1,236
Tennessee
My Coop
My Coop
I’m sorry you lost your flock. That must have been a heartbreaking experience. Before you start over, you must sterilize and deep clean everything you will want to use again. Not everything can be kept though. @azygous and @Wyorp Rock might can help clarify how/what to sterilize/clean/get rid of.
I am a big fan of friendly/docile breeds to. I have 7 chickens, and I have found that my top three abortive breeds are the Lavender Orpington (a type of Orpington like the Buff one you are looking at- Look into the different colors before you dive right into Buff!) Speckled Sussex, and Easter Egger (I think that the “Steele Egger” is a Meyer Hatchery thing, so I dont know what their personalities are like and how they relate to Easter Eggers)

I highly recommend the Speckled Sussex. I have one, and she’s sort of like a dog who loves people and never runs away from you. It takes practice and attention of course, but this breed is really very docile and beautiful.

Orpingtons are the same way. While mine still is at that “eww don’t touch me” teenager stage, she’s quite friendly and calm. I would also recommend them. They come in a several different colors besides Buff, such as Lavender, Black, White, etc.

EEs are also the same way. Very outgoing, curious, sweet, and friendly. As the nam “Easter Egger” suggests, they lay colorful eggs. Most commonly Blue Green Or pink, but Tan and white might also become apparent. They one color egg for life, but the tiny might fade through the season.

Mypetchicken has a “friendliest breeds” list. I don’t think it’s completely accurate though since Speckled Sussex are listed as #2 not #1 and that definitely is a mistake :gig https://www.thehappychickencoop.com/the-top-10-friendliest-chicken-breeds/

In my case, I would chose from your list 3 SSs, 1 EE, 1 Steele Egger or Olive Egger, 2 Orpingtons, and 1 Welsummer. This is entirely my opinion though, so you might have a different approach!
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
25,371
38,434
1,142
Colorado Rockies
Yes. Before you indulge in the exciting and happy exercise of selecting new breeds to begin a new flock, you need to identify all of the diseases that may be present now in the bedding, soil, and coops. Some, like Marek's, live a very long time in the environment. Others are not nearly as durable, and using simple disinfectant or bleach solution will get rid of them. Bacteria usually is killed easily by fresh air and sunlight. Viruses tend to live longer and can be more challenging to eradicate.

Get started right now, clean thoroughly after tossing out all bedding. Then open up the coops to air out and expose to sunlight if possible,

You overlooked Brahmas in your selections. Also Cochins. These are heavy breeds, extremely docile and natural snugglers. They aren't real terrific layers, though. But as pets, they're as close to lovable puppies as you'll get in chickens.

Wyandottes are among the most gorgeous chickens you'll encounter. They are wicked good layers. They will keep laying like nobody's business well into old age. I have an eleven-year old SLW who lays a few eggs still every spring just to prove she can. I have a GLW at age ten currently broody and raising three pullets. GLWs are the most intense broodies, and have a high liklihood of going broody if you want to assure yourself of having a broody hen if you someday want to hatch chicks from your own flock. (You would need a rooster, too, though)
 

Foxinthehenhouse

Songster
Aug 7, 2019
196
359
126
Cruso, NC
Yes. Before you indulge in the exciting and happy exercise of selecting new breeds to begin a new flock, you need to identify all of the diseases that may be present now in the bedding, soil, and coops. Some, like Marek's, live a very long time in the environment. Others are not nearly as durable, and using simple disinfectant or bleach solution will get rid of them. Bacteria usually is killed easily by fresh air and sunlight. Viruses tend to live longer and can be more challenging to eradicate.

Get started right now, clean thoroughly after tossing out all bedding. Then open up the coops to air out and expose to sunlight if possible,

You overlooked Brahmas in your selections. Also Cochins. These are heavy breeds, extremely docile and natural snugglers. They aren't real terrific layers, though. But as pets, they're as close to lovable puppies as you'll get in chickens.

Wyandottes are among the most gorgeous chickens you'll encounter. They are wicked good layers. They will keep laying like nobody's business well into old age. I have an eleven-year old SLW who lays a few eggs still every spring just to prove she can. I have a GLW at age ten currently broody and raising three pullets. GLWs are the most intense broodies, and have a high liklihood of going broody if you want to assure yourself of having a broody hen if you someday want to hatch chicks from your own flock. (You would need a rooster, too, though)
Everything was taken out of the coop including roosts and burned. The coop was then sterilized. The run was raked and covered by lime. All feeders were sterilized. The state gave me the info about what I needed to do. They said by spring it would be safe. 🙏🏻🤞🏻
 

AntiqueB

Crowing
Aug 27, 2020
1,256
4,322
496
Bergen County, NJ
I have a Buff Orpington and Easter Egger. Both are very friendly, and will follow me, jump on my lap or shoulder, and generally want to hang out and talk. I had a Speckled Sussex I had to rehome, but he was also very much a lap chicken.
 

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