Rhode Island Red aggression

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by mwells6chicks, Oct 18, 2013.

  1. mwells6chicks

    mwells6chicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi, I have a molting 16 month RIR who this past summer started pecking at my toes. Now she stares me down and goes right for my feet and stands in my way so I can't get past her. When I shove her with my foot she starts for my legs. My husband said she did that to him yesterday but then he followed her around and I think intimidated her. My youngest daughter said she was pecked at too. So any advice what to do with her. I'm thinking of rehoming her but she is not even laying eggs now and downright ugly without her feathers. I don't know how long the molt last. Any ideas?
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    1-4 months depending on if it is a hard or soft molt. Sounds like she's lost a lot at once. That's preferable since it is quicker.
     
  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    About the molt, yeah, ChickenCanoe nailed that one.

    What to do about the hen that pecks and attacks people.

    1. Put up with it. I wouldn’t, even if I didn’t have kids around. With kids around I certainly would not allow it. I value kids more than chickens.

    2.Rehome her. Realize that once she’s gone you’ve lost control of her. Someone will probably eat her so she is at least of benefit to someone. Besides, would you want to put someone else’s kids in danger?

    3.Eat her yourself. She’s make great soup or chicken and dumplings. Older chickens make really good broth. Or cook her in a crock pot overnight. Tender and delicious.

    4.You can try to teach her to not be aggressive. Catch her. Hold her and carry her around while you do your chores. If she attacks or even approaches, remove her with your foot. I don’t mean kick her hard enough to break bones. Lift her with your foot and toss her a few feet. It won’t hurt her. Walk toward her and make her back down. Chase her for a few minutes at a time, giving her no chance to rest. Teach her thoroughly that you are in charge, not her. Then have everyone that is associated with her do the same.
     
  4. mwells6chicks

    mwells6chicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 8, 2013
    NJ
    Thanks for your advice. A hawk recently visited us and took care of the problem. I just picked up 6 new chicks, 2 Ameracaunas, 2 buff orpingtons and 2 barred rock. Looking forward to raising this new flock.
     
  5. ndstructable

    ndstructable Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a rooster that is becoming VERY aggressive. Attacking my legs every time I go in or near the coop. I push him off with my foot or kick dust at him, but a few moments later he comes back for more. This morning it was non stop. I am at the point where he may become dinner, but he is the only rooster I have right now. Is there anyway to save him and calm his aggression?
     
  6. JennaLynn122

    JennaLynn122 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have the same problem with my GLW roo. Recently I decided that I would show him 1. I'm not going to hurt him and 2. I'm the boss not him. Sooo... I first put one TWO pairs of thick jeans to prevent it hurting and cutting so bad. Then I go in the coop and stand my ground. If I can, pick him up. If not, nudge him off with my foot. If he stops. I leave him until evening. I'll get to evening in a moment.
    If he does not stop.I go get a medium dog crate, put it at the outside opening to the coop and corral him into it. This take a while. And then I close it off and go to my run slowly tip it up on end so I don't hurt him and pick him up and cuddle him and walk him around with me everywhere until he calms himself. Then I give him some slack and just pet him. He is calm when I put him back in the coop. I do this at least once a week.

    Every evening I go in while he is roosting and pet him and sweet talk him and give him special treats. My hens DO NOT get these treats. That way he knows they are only his. And he is showing much improvement.

    And DONT turn your back to him! You will be flogged.
     
  7. mwells6chicks

    mwells6chicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 8, 2013
    NJ
    A quick follow up: the hawk took the nice RIR and left Dottie with us. She continues to come after me but not as often. I carry a stick or a rake with me and use that to herd the flock around and she knows what that mean. She did peck my daughter again a few days ago. I think once our new chicks start laying eggs, I'm going to rehome her to my friends farm. BTW, I have a Delaware Hen that has a prolapse and I'm dealing with that now, Poor thing.

    Michelle
     
  8. JennaLynn122

    JennaLynn122 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have completely cured my GLW of aggression. Every time he came at me I would smack his wing and then hold him down on his side until he stopped struggling. Then saint about 60 seconds with him completely still and let him up. I did this every time he came at me for a few months. Now I can walkup to him and he will leave or just ignore me.
     
  9. mwells6chicks

    mwells6chicks Out Of The Brooder

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    I tried this with my RIR and while I had her down another hen (my Delaware) came by and started pecking at her face and comb. Talk about no mercy.
     
  10. rc4u

    rc4u Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i dont pick them up but use my rake to hold them on the ground till they dont struggle and submit...i dont like holding my chickens...my back hurts and dont like to bend over..so my rake holds them down fine and i think they get the idea much quicker without human contact...jeff
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2014

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