RIR or NHR? Hen or Rooster?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Lin20, Jun 20, 2015.

  1. Lin20

    Lin20 Out Of The Brooder

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    Hello everyone, I've been blessed with a lovely chicken but would like to confirm its breed. I was told it was a RIR but I'm not sure because of its tail which has a darker colour to its rest of the body which could make it a NHR. Ive also included a closeup pic of its feathers under its neck.
    Is my chook a hen or rooster? may be about 6 months old, we don't know the exact age.
    Thank you in advance. I'm no expert and so appreciate everyone's experience. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2015
  2. Blackberry18

    Blackberry18 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Rhode Island Reds (hatchery and good quality) naturally have black-tipped tails, but the black-tipped hackle feathers are a feature of New Hampshires, but it also has the coloration of a hatchery Rhode Island Red. I'm going to go with Production Red, which is often a cross of New Hampshire x Rhode Island Red, or so I've heard.
     
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  3. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    I agree; she's a Production Red pullet. Strictly speaking there is little or no difference between the Production Reds, Rhode Island Reds, and New Hampshires of most hatcheries. Production Reds, which are bred for high egg production with little or no regard to APA standards, are produced by crossing red gene roosters (RIR, NH, or PR) with red gene hens (RIR, NH, or PR). If the offspring have darker red feathering (closer to mahogany) and black feathers in the tail, the hatcheries market them as RIRs. If the offspring have lighter red feathering (closer to chestnut) and black feathers in the tail, the hatcheries market them as NHs. If the offspring have a shade of red somewhere down the middle, or if their red shading is uneven or has a few flecks of another color in it (like your pullet), or if there are no black feathers in the tail, then the hatchery markets them as Production Reds.
     
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  4. Blackberry18

    Blackberry18 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What about Red Sex-Links? I've heard those being marketed as Production Reds, but that can't be a red gene x red gene cross; as a silver gene has to be contributed by the female.
     
  5. Toddrick

    Toddrick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    RSL's have a white undercoat and usually white splotches, and white tails, not black.

    Your Red does look different than most Production Red's I've seen. It has larger thighs and more black in its hackles. Like O'Shay says, every hatchery's Reds are probably different mixes in reality. That's why they call them Production Red's instead of RIR's.
     
  6. Michael OShay

    Michael OShay Chicken Obsessed

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    Red Sex Links are sold under a lot of different labels, but I don't know of any hatchery that markets Red Sex Links as Production Reds. Your right about RSL breeding. They are produced by crossing a red gene rooster X a silver gene hen and the offspring can be sexed by color from hatching. No hatchery that I know of makes that claim about their Production Reds. Red Sex Links will not breed true, but PR roosters X PR hens will always give reddish chicks (not sex linked) whether they are male or female. Because of this distinction, some experts consider Production Reds to be a true breed as in the following quote from Purely Poultry:
    Production Reds are a true breed derived from Rhode Island Reds and the New Hampshire Reds. What this means is if you have a flock of Production Reds, they will be able to sustain themselves. Their fertile hatching eggs will results in more Production Reds. If you are a 4H kid or otherwise looking to show a bird, this is the choice for you.
    The Red Sex Link is a hybrid, created by crossing a Rhode Island Red male and a Delaware Female. This means that a pair of Red Sex-Link parents will not result in more Red Sex-Links. You must have Rhode Island Red roosters and Delaware hens and their fertile hatching eggs will result in Red Sex-Links.
    (https://www.purelypoultry.com/blog/...tween-production-reds-and-sex-linked-hybrids/)
     
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  7. Blackberry18

    Blackberry18 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you so much! I've read that Red Sex-Link x Red Sex-Link cross will not produce sex-linked offspring, but what kind of offspring would that produce? I though I read that it would produce mostly chicks with male coloration, but wasn't sure.
     
  8. LoveThemBirds

    LoveThemBirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Im actually going with a NewHampshire.That looks like a true newhamp to me.But she is definatlly a pullet.

    Production reds usually don't have black on the mane...
     
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  9. Lin20

    Lin20 Out Of The Brooder

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    I've not heard of Production Reds till now so thanks for all that info. Im in Australia and I've not heard of the name 'Production Reds' being used.

    Do you think that is definitely a hen too?
     
  10. Lin20

    Lin20 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh just read LoveThemBirds comment its a pullet. :)
     

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