Rooster as a pet?

nrsenadenos

In the Brooder
May 22, 2015
8
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So "Annie" is starting to crow (at least I think that is what the noise was!). I would like to keep him indoors until he is big enough to eat, or longer if he can become a decent pet. I've read that roosters are actually quite smart and can be kept as pets. Is this realistic? And if so, what should I be doing now to make sure he is a good pet as an adult? He is 5 weeks now and either a welsummer or a brown leghorn.
 

nrsenadenos

In the Brooder
May 22, 2015
8
1
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400
He's quite docile if you are quiet around him.
 

Luke 13V34

Chirping
5 Years
May 25, 2015
145
3
96
Roosters are excellent pets. Keep holding him at various times, and let him associate your presence with good things like warmth and food. He will view you as his mom while growing up, and without other chickens, you are in his flock. I've had several roosters that were super friendly because I held them all the time.
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
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Colorado Rockies
It's correct that roosters make great pets. Not only that, but if you have a dog or other animals, a rooster is likely to bond with those and be quite content without other chickens.

However, a young cockerel will need training and discipline from now until after he goes through his hormonal phase. This is crucial as a cockerel left undisciplined can turn into quite a tyrant and even become dangerous.

He may have a mellow temperament now, but it's almost guaranteed he will go through some degree of personality change around five or six months of age as the hormones begin to surge. You can get a head start on discipline by holding him frequently and demonstrating your dominance over him.

The way you show dominance is to make it known that you are the one in control. When you pick him up and he isn't in the mood to be held, you tighten your grip, confining his movements until he relaxes, then you release him only when he isn't struggling to get free.

Pick him up frequently throughout the day, from this point on, and do this conditioning exercise. By the time he reaches the hormonal stage, and he begins to challenge you, this conditioning will make it much easier to discipline him, and it won't take but a few weeks to establish what his role is, hormones and all.

Meanwhile, read up on how to discipline a rooster with hormones so you will be clear what the various symptoms of aggression are and how to deal with them.
 

nrsenadenos

In the Brooder
May 22, 2015
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Besides aggression are there any other behaviors to watch for? Like I know a lot of male mammals will mark territory. We have a large dog but I don't think I would allow them much interaction because the dog would unintentionally hurt him (husky mix so not great with small animals. )
 

Folly's place

Enabler
9 Years
Sep 13, 2011
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Chickens are social animals who should be in a flock, not solitary. I don't think that the life of a solitary house bird is a good idea, and he's not going to learn polite chicken behaviors, either. Let him be a chicken!!! He needs to be polite at all times toward humans; raising him up right is part of the story, and his genetic makeup is the rest. Mary
 

thegawd

Chirping
May 17, 2015
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chickens are livestock... not pets although we may treat them as such. im sure the local health dept would have a big problem with it.

Al
 

nrsenadenos

In the Brooder
May 22, 2015
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@foleys place if we don't keep him as an indoor pet he will be dinner. I have a butcher arranged if need be. We are in the city, and while chickens are allowed, roosters are not, so the odds of finding a home are slim.

@Al...thanks for the input, but from a health department standpoint how would keeping a solitary rooster indoors be any different than a large parrot like a macaw or cockatoo? Obviously he would need bedding changed, food and water, but so would a large bird.
 

thegawd

Chirping
May 17, 2015
141
21
57
care isnt much different ill admit. but the price point sure is... if it was legal id be afraid alot of poultry would be kept alot more in houses and in disgusting situations. there generally is a health code that applies to livestock being so far away from human dwellings ect ect and its there for a reason. man I hate brooding chicks in the house and cant wait to get them outside. I live up in Canada and my oldest daughter really wants Seramas but we dont have any way to properly house them outside while keeping them very warm... for that reason we dont have any Seramas. Chickens are social birds that need other birds for company and belong outside...

temporarily is one thing, forever is another.

im truly sorry you cant keep a rooster but these laws are in place for a reason, so are health codes.

p.s. im frankly disgusted that people on this site permanently keep ducks and geese in the house... YUK

Al
 

MANNA-PRO

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