Rooster Behavior ??'s

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by FluffyChic, Jan 17, 2010.

  1. FluffyChic

    FluffyChic Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We got an 8mos old BR Roo to add to our 6 mos old pullets a few weeks ago. We got him because we'd like to hatch some of our own in the spring to keep a steady # of chickens to eat and continue to keep our laying girls that we have now(and maybe keep a few along the way;). He blended well and seems to be taking care of his hens well. However he is definitely aggressive towards DH and I and our 4yr and 2yr old dd's. We were in the yard letting them free range yesterday and he came up behind my 2yr old and knocked her down. She wasn't really hurt aside from a bump on the head from the ground, but she was of course scared to death. DH gave him some swift kicks around the yard to let him know that was not ok. BTW my 2yr old wasn't even trying to come near a pullet, he definitely goes after her and her sister more because of their size. This is not the first time this has happened, he has come after my 4yr too and she has handled the pullets since chicks.

    DH has read the articles on how to do dominance training w/them. He has also been working w/him regularly with it. We thought he was getting better but then he chomped on dh's hand and wouldn't let go when he was holding him. He also did the same to me. But in my opinion it's not worth it if we could find a replacement to do the same job as him, breeding, but w/out all the aggression. Yes, I know he's doing his job to protect and apparently the kids espec are easy targets We a have a flock of great hand raised pullets that have always been sweet, the BO girls are def the most gentle and the BR girls are a little flighty, but sweet too. Now, the girls almost seem a little more agressive and flighty than usual because of him. It is neat having a roo in the mix, but not at the expense of giving my dd's a bad experience to be around him or possibly getting hurt. We like to let them free range some, and I'm always out w/my dd's but want to let them play as well but they've been so used to the girls being sweet to them that now my dd's end up being pensive around the roo.

    So to sum up:

    Do we need to raise a cockeral from a chick and handle for better results?

    Are there breeds that don't charge at adults and children?

    Would you keep him given the circumstances?

    Is there a way to continue to have the great experiences we've had w/our pullets with a Roo in the mix?


    I know there are a lot of posts on this as well, which I've read...just would like some personalized answers/opinions. TIA:D
     
  2. onthespot

    onthespot Deluxe Dozens

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    I wouldn't keep one THAT mean for any reason. Post in the WANTED section that you are looking for a gentle roo. Make soup out of the one you have. Also, if you need him in the meantime, just let him out a few hours to do his deeds and then put him away in a cage for the rest of the time.
     
  3. pkeeler

    pkeeler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Shamong
    I think he thinks you are all roosters and he needs to fight you to maintain dominance. You can try one more strategy. Always have cracked corn (or oats/scratch, et. al.) with you. When he comes over and starts, throw a handful of grain in front of him. He should forget all about the fight and eat the corn. If you consistently do this, he might tame. Give it a shot, look for another rooster (there are usually plenty), and get the pot and axe ready.

    If you are predisposed to keep a rooster that attacks people, you might not be cut out for keeping roosters. [​IMG]

    I've had BBR Game roosters, one attacked, one didn't. Red Cap roosters that didn't, but attacked the dog, another Red Cap that left me alone but attacked my wife constantly, Speckled Sussex rooster currently, that wants to attack but stops, a California White rooster that totally ignores people, but others that would gang up on hens. IMO, you need to get a handful at cull to you find one or two.

    Feather footed roosters have generally been tame for me. But do you want feather footed chicks?

    I think having a rooster is great, much more interesting than just hens. But you have to treat them like livestock and be willing to cull the bad ones. They've been bred for virility and eating, not for petting.
     
  4. pkeeler

    pkeeler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Shamong
    Oh, and if you get rid of the rooster you can still raise chicks. Just wait till a hen goes broody (they will do that with or without a rooster), then get some hatching eggs and put them under her. Lots of people sell eggs on this site, and all the hatcheries.
     
  5. onthespot

    onthespot Deluxe Dozens

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    Yes, and don't forget to check out the new crazy 24 hour auction... pm me for details! LOL
     
  6. FluffyChic

    FluffyChic Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks all. We decided the risk was not worth it around our two precious little girls. So, we are having our Roo for dinner tonight;). We'll hopefully find a better fit, and a gentler roo for our family.
     
  7. LeghornLisa

    LeghornLisa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Rooster are funny you just never know. I had 2 silkie roos and everyone told me they wouldn't get mean. Long story short, they did and I also have 2 small children and just can't have mean pets. I raised them from babies, held them, loved them, did everything to try and train them. In the end their hormones kick in and that is when you see the true roo...I re-homed them, being a vegetarian there was no way they were going to freezer camp. I'm just glad they never got my kids, I was the one bleeding. I hope this works for you, please keep a close eye on your kids, for some reason rooster are known for going for the face!
     
  8. chickenshagg

    chickenshagg THE ALPHA ROO

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    Unfortunately I just had to cull a rooster yeserday. He was mean and aggressive! I tried all the things that have been posted on re-teaching a rooster or dominating the rooster but he just got more aggressive. I would pick him up and walk around the yard with him for a while and when I put him down he would come at me to attack. I would give him a swift kick and chase him then he would run off with the girls. Whenever I would walk into the run or the coop he would start screaming. The other day when i walked into the coop everyone was up on their roost when all of a sudden he launched himself right me. The final straw came when they were out in the yard free ranging and a girlscout was walking down the street, on the other side. The rooster took off after her. Fortunately my son saw this happenning from the front window and was able to run out after the roo and get him back into the yard.

    I knew that night what I was going to have to do. To reafirm my decision the rooster crowed all night long. The rooster is gone now!
     
  9. Keri78

    Keri78 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have one HUGE Giant Black Cochin Boy(Sweet Sweet Sweet as pie...does his "job" well and is just as nice and passive as he can be around my little ones!)
    I also have a buff frizz. banty roo also sweet and friendly with the kids.
    Then I have testos. boy (Mr. Fluffy white frizz. roo) that wil attack anyone that comes close enough for no good reason! He was predistined to be dinner or live a life of solitude and lucky for him he's just too pretty for dinner and I need him too bad right now so I can have nice frizz babies this spring!(LOL) Soo he gets "visits" with his girls in his chickie tractor and the rest of the time he's much happier alone!

    I got them all as day old babies and they all were handled the same way????
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2010

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