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Rooster question

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Godsgrl, Oct 18, 2008.

  1. Godsgrl

    Godsgrl Ostrich wrangler

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    I understand it is bad for a roo to drop his wing at you, but this is a new one for me.

    What does it mean if a roo offers you food? The other day, my friend's roo, Flyer, offered my 14 year old daughter a piece of grass. She said it isn't the first time he's done it.

    Is this just sweet stuff, or is it potentially dangerous behavior like wing dropping? Thanks![​IMG]
     
  2. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    He was trying to treat her as a hen, which is not a good thing. Same goes for the wing dropping, he was trying to get you to submit.
    It's best to not let this go any further. If I were you I'd be taking steps to make sure the roo understands that you are the alpha, not him.
     
  3. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    Quote:yups,,,, in fact when he did that, she, or an adult actually, should have RUN at him being as big as you can, and CHASE him down.
     
  4. Godsgrl

    Godsgrl Ostrich wrangler

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    thank you for the replies. My daughter sent Flyer flying across the yard when he offered her the grass. Glad to know that was the right thing. Thanks for the information, I was quite puzzled.
     
  5. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    Yeah my roo tried ONCE to get me in line and I shined a flashlight in his face and hollered NO! and went at him. He backed down, and now he gives my stink eye but keeps his distance.
     
  6. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Me, who would never allow a rooster to dance at her, got the impression that my Hawkeye showing me things to eat on the ground was merely being sociable. He never showed any aggression nor challenged me in any way and was always very mild-mannered and sweet with me. I'd just tell him, "Yes, I see that. Thank you, buddy". You'd have to have known Hawkeye. He was the perfect gentleman with me from the time I rescued him from that bog he was living in till he passed on suddenly. He definitely knew who was in charge here, instinctively. I think you have to have a sense of what his intentions are. If you sense he's bringing you to the level of his hens, action is called for, certainly. I cant say I would be that way with even Hawkeye's sons, till I really know what they're all about. With any rooster, you have to keep on your toes, though, just to be safe.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2008
  7. chickenbike

    chickenbike Chillin' With My Peeps

    May I ask what "wing dropping" is?
     
  8. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:You're completely right speckled. It would depend on the roo. If my little shadow Thor did it I'd probably let it pass, as long as he did nothing else; like wing dropping. If Zeus did it he'd be getting another lesson in alpha-ism.
     
  9. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    Quote:Wing dropping is a courting gesture, however, ALL mine drop their wings when they are stretching.
     
  10. Godsgrl

    Godsgrl Ostrich wrangler

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    As far as intentions go with a roo, we know what Flyer's intentions are, I'm afraid. He's gone after all of us at one time or another. Spurring, biting, he's not a nice roo at all. Thanks for the replies!
     

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