Rooster's floppy comb impairing his vision

LoveMyCornishHen

Hatching
Jan 28, 2018
5
4
9
I have a rooster, around a year old or so, who's father was a true blue whiting and whose mother is an americauna. He has a large, round pea comb (unlike the single combs and very small pea combs on the hens in the flock), which droops over to one side. It covers his left eye. I'm not sure if it's really a big issue, but he seems to see primarily out of his left eye, since he always turns his head to look at things, and I'm worried this might hinder him in protecting the rest of the flock from a predator. Is there any way I can suspend his comb so it doesn't hang over and block his eye? If anything, it seems like it would be an annoyance for him to constantly have his own comb whacking him in the face, so if anyone has suggestions, I'll be glad to hear them! :)
 

hillbilly91

Crowing
Jan 2, 2016
1,423
2,906
486
Westminster sc
I have a rooster, around a year old or so, who's father was a true blue whiting and whose mother is an americauna. He has a large, round pea comb (unlike the single combs and very small pea combs on the hens in the flock), which droops over to one side. It covers his left eye. I'm not sure if it's really a big issue, but he seems to see primarily out of his left eye, since he always turns his head to look at things, and I'm worried this might hinder him in protecting the rest of the flock from a predator. Is there any way I can suspend his comb so it doesn't hang over and block his eye? If anything, it seems like it would be an annoyance for him to constantly have his own comb whacking him in the face, so if anyone has suggestions, I'll be glad to hear them! :)
Cut it off. They have trimming videos on youtube
 

LoveMyCornishHen

Hatching
Jan 28, 2018
5
4
9
Cut it off. They have trimming videos on youtube
That's interesting, I didn't know you could trim a comb (I always assumed they had as much feeling as the rest of the body). I looked into it a bit, and I'm seeing a lot of mixed opinions on it. I would definitely use very sharp scissors and try to make the whole process as quick as possible (a few of the videos I saw definitely were not good examples of how to humanely do it). I'm worried about the possibility of infection and the associated stress, do you think it would be worth it? His comb doesn't seem like too much an issue from a health perspective, as it doesn't get particularly cold where I live and there's been no issues with fighting or tearing the comb. I appreciate the suggestion, but I'm not sure if this might not be worth the risk, considering I have no experience doing this.
 

EggWalrus

Free Ranging
Aug 14, 2017
2,064
5,044
567
Southeast Alabama
Just get some cornstarch or flour (in case he bleeds a little), a sterilized sharp pair of scissors or a sharp pocket knife. Wrap him in a towel so he's easier to hold without any flapping or fighting you.
Then "Snip". And you're done!
I've done hundreds and only once in a while will you get one that bless more than a couple drops. Every chicken I've docked the comb on (even hens) has been ok and seems to enjoy themselves quite a bit more with the comb out of the way.
Good luck!
 

EggWalrus

Free Ranging
Aug 14, 2017
2,064
5,044
567
Southeast Alabama
Yep, that thing needs to go. He won't know how to act for a few days once he can see out of both eyes! He will probably act like a brand new chicken! Can you get a pic with you holding that comb up so we can see his left eye. Try to get a pic of the comb base also while it's held up.
You won't need to scalp him down to the skull like with a game cock, just one quick straight snip from some sharp scissors so its not hanging in his eye. He's not a show bird so you don't have to worry if the snip isn't perfect and pretty, he'll be happy to see again and he won't mind.
:thumbsup
I doubt his favorite hens will mind either. :gig
 

Folly's place

Crossing the Road
8 Years
Sep 13, 2011
17,548
22,926
906
southern Michigan
I agree that this is a disability, and he will be safer seeing out of both eyes. It's not about cosmetics here, and if you don't want to do it, get some help, or ask your veterinarian (who's likely never done one either).
See how much needs to go, and where the best 'cutting line' is, so you aren't cutting through the thickest part of that comb. Have something to stop or lesson bleeding too. Pressure on the site, or ice, would also help if necessary.
Post pictures!
Mary
 
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