Roosters

DobieLover

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i believe I only have one silver laced Wyondotte Rooster, with 29 hens
Should I add another Rooster?
It depends.
If you are breeding high quality SLWs, you will want more than one SOP quality rooster.
If your birds are just for layers and pets, you don't need to have any roosters.
If you like having roosters and have plenty of room in the coop (especially lots of roosting space) and run, you can have more than one rooster. It will change the dynamics of the flock.
If you have any small children, I would strongly advise you wait to see how your current boy behaves. Is he a rooster or just a cockerel now?
 

Rlmp817

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What are your flock plans? That really will dictate how many roos you should have.
Last year I had one, not worried about breeding, but liked how he handled the flock.
This year I seperate my flock into 2 coops and currently have 3 roos, one will be culled.
I am planning on breeding 2 flocks for chicks in the spring, EEs and either Wyandottes or langshans depending on temperaments.
Knowing your plan is important to give you the best advice. :D
 

gtaus

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Everyone loves my Silver Laced Wyandotte hen the best because of her coloring. She is rather pretty. Nice bird, too. I imagine a SLW rooster would be even more colorful.

As already mentioned, you don't need a rooster for eggs, only for breeding.

Edited for clarity: Some people like to keep a rooster for flock protection. I am thinking that if a rooster is in the position of having to defend the flock, maybe they should rethink their security for their birds.
 
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J99

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Everyone loves my Silver Laced Wyandotte hen the best because of her coloring. She is rather pretty. Nice bird, too. I imagine a SLW rooster would be even more colorful.

As already mentioned, you don't need a rooster for eggs, only for breeding. Some people like to keep a rooster for flock protection. I am thinking that if your rooster is in the position of having to defend the flock, you had better rethink your security for your birds.
Why? I am not understanding why you say I should rethink my security?
 

gtaus

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Why? I am not understanding why you say I should rethink my security?

I was not referring to you personally, I was referring to "some people" I have seen that keep roosters for the protection of their flock. My thinking, for me anyway, is to make my coop and chicken run predator resistance so that no predator gets close to my girls. That's the security I was talking about, not you personally. I edited that post for clarity, hope it helps.
 
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DobieLover

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He’s 4 months old and all the “ hens” are just pullets ranging from 5/7 weeks old. I just wanted them for eggs breeding and pets for now anyway , but I have ten buff Orpingtons and I really wanted a buff Rooster
If you want a buff rooster, you can give it a try. I would personally wait until your pullets have come into lay. You don't want a mature, sexually driven rooster in with a flock of sexually immature pullets.
Then I would select a rooster that has already proven he is gentle with the ladies and non-human aggressive. A mature bird, preferably well over a year old.
No rooster can defend his flock from anything other than another rooster or maybe a lone housecat. But the good ones are ever vigilant and will sound the alarm giving his hens a chance to seek cover.
 

Folly's place

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Cockerels and adult roosters should be watching for danger (and cockerels need experience!) but seldom will be willing or able to actually 'defend'. Most predators are bigger, stronger, and trickier than any rooster you might have.
Helpful, yes. Security, not so much.
For beauty, flock dynamics, and of course breeding, roosters are wonderful though.
If you actually plan to raise purebreds, you need cockerels of that breed.
Because this is new to you, I'd recommend keeping your (so far) nice cockerel, and next spring ordering some straight run BO chicks, or even just a few males, and sort out a good prospect from that group.
Introducing adult roosters into a flock with resident adult cock birds is VERY difficult! Your adult rooster next year will accept chicks, and the cockerels will have the benefit of both adult hens and the rooster raising them up right, eating some 'humble pie'.
Mary
 

J99

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Ok so I’ll get BO Cockerel next year then but bringing a few babies into my large grown flock is difficult because of bullying, so I thought it would be better to get them now small and let them establish pecking order at this five to seven week age ? However my one Rooster is 4 months old so he’s at least two months older then everyone else and established dominance quick so I don’t know
 

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