selecting healthy chicks

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Kimberly4403, Jul 15, 2016.

  1. Kimberly4403

    Kimberly4403 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Im getting 3 sexed Wyandotte chicks tomorrow from a local breeder what are the things to look out for when selecting healthy chicks
     
  2. Auntie Moose

    Auntie Moose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am absolutely NOT an expert, but when we picked our chicks we watched them for a few minutes to see if any were lethargic or that didn't look "perky." They could just be tired, but try to see if they move around when touched. That's literally all I know about picking chicks! Mine are now almost six weeks and all doing well.
     
  3. azygous

    azygous Flock Master

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    What Auntie Moose said - pick the perky ones.

    Also, avoid the tiny, undersized one that looks so cute, especially if it's just standing still looking up.

    Look at the butts. Are the vents clean and free of poop? Don't select one with a poopy butt.

    Look at the legs and feet. Are the legs straight and the toes straight? If the toes curl, don't select that one.

    Avoid the hyper one that is running around pecking at all its mates. It's not going to be so cute when it starts drawing blood after you get it home.

    If you desire only pullets, look at the wings carefully. Avoid any that have no wing buds coming out of their wing stubs. Look for emerging wing buds that are in two staggered rows. Those are more likely to be girls.
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Pick healthy, active looking birds. DO NOT "RESCUE" a sickly, lethargic, droopy, pasty butt chick cause you feel sorry for it.

    Normal, healthy chicks get up and move freely. They may be sleeping soundly when you approach, but putting your hand in the brooder should cue them to get up and usually move, either away from you or to investigate. This isn't always an indicator of temperament, but can simply be how much the chicks have been handled. I don't handle my birds much, so they always run away like I'm a big scary monster [​IMG]. Any chick that is slow to get up, or doesn't move freely is one to pass on.

    Any chick that moves oddly, limps, is spraddle legged, uses it's wings to balance, etc is one to pass on.

    chicks with pasty butt are a no go for me.

    If you get there and the brooder is nasty or stinky, the waterer is foul, the parent birds look unhealthy, etc....just pass. I don't care if you drove an hour to get them, it's not worth the heartache of starting with ill or unthrifty birds. Yep, it's hard to tell someone you came out intending to purchase birds but theirs aren't what you're looking for, but it can be done.
     
  5. Folly's place

    Folly's place True BYC Addict

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    I would add that if ANY of the birds look unwell, don't get chicks there. I'm not talking about molting adults, who can look really unkempt, but any droopy sick birds. Mary
     
  6. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I always like to show folks my parent stock when I sell chicks. Usually don't have any molting during chick sales, but I do have two hens that are a little bare backed right now. Folks seem pretty accepting of that, cause everyone else looks nice. I agree, if the adult stock looks ill or the place just looks nasty, pass.
     
  7. realsis

    realsis Crazy for Silkies

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    Here is a little point to remember, i know they are sexed but even the Most experienced,and professional sexers are only 90% accurate. That leaves a 10% margin of error in even the BEST Sexers. Remember, little males are usually more outgoing and friendly as chicks and the females more reserved and shy. Folks tend to make the mistake and gravitate towards the more friendly one and end up with males. Not saying little females cant be friendly, but they do usually avoid strangers while the little male is by nature more curious. Hope this tip helps. Good luck and congratulations on your new birds. I have a laced Wyandotte myself and they are as sweet as beautiful!
     
  8. Auntie Moose

    Auntie Moose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good to know! Too late for me this year, but I will remember this.
     

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