Ruthster55

Crowing
Nov 23, 2013
1,001
1,719
291
Northern South America
These are November beetles. They usually eat the vegetation on living fenceposts, but are an occasional pest on citrus trees because they eat citrus flowers and thus inhibit fruit set. The time to collect them is right at dusk while using a flashlight.

And they drive the chickens absolutely WILD!!
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Ruthster55

Crowing
Nov 23, 2013
1,001
1,719
291
Northern South America
Guess who decided to have the first hatch of 2021?

This hen has been very dedicated with a clutch of eggs since around Christmas.

Today, she showed up with some results!

A note is that this is a repeat performance after a mite disaster last year. A permethrin treatment (with a lice shampoo intended for human children) a couple months ago was the trick that encouraged her to make that broody commitment once again. Dedicated is the word...heard her clucking to her eggs yesterday.

This time, she was successful and hatched ~5 chickies!

The weather for the past three months has been mostly rainy and damp. Here’s hoping that she keeps the little cuties warm and dry!

P.S. I gently selected the eggs. I let her have the blue and green ones!
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Last edited:

bhawk-23

Chirping
Apr 12, 2020
247
273
96
East Central Illinois (Urbana, IL)
These are November beetles. They usually eat the vegetation on living fenceposts, but are an occasional pest on citrus trees because they eat citrus flowers and thus inhibit fruit set. The time to collect them is right at dusk while using a flashlight.

And they drive the chickens absolutely WILD!!
. View attachment 2416913
We also snatch those bugs off our fruit trees for the ladies. They go nuts! They follow us from tree to tree talking like crazy 😂
 

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