Sex- linked Information

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by tadkerson, Oct 27, 2009.

  1. mikkles

    mikkles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    thank you for saying this!
     
  2. Sazbaby

    Sazbaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ok... I have some basic genetics education in my background, but know little of chicken genetics as well as color genetics in chickens... I find this subject quite fascinating and am trying to find accurate information that I can learn from... I have read through the first post many many times and refer to it regularly, it is a WONDERFUL wealth of information condensed into an excellent form!!! Here's my question... How do the genetics of a Red Dorking rooster fit into this plan??? I'm considering (actually half-way into it already) a flock of nearly exclusively Red Dorkings and Delawares for dual purpose use. I'd like to be able to produce a sex-linked chick for sex determination at hatch. Would the genetics of a Red Dorking work similarly to the males in Group 1? Would it work crossing to a Delaware hen? Could I assume chicks would be wild type with orangish down for girls and lighter yellow down for boys?

    Along those same lines, another question (remember, I know/understand little about color genetics in these breeds yet...) What about crossing a Red Dorking roo with a Silver Gray Dorking female? My understanding is that cockerels would mature to "golden" dorkings, would females have the possibility of being red *or* silver gray?? Would you be able to tell them apart at hatch? My mind is swimming already and I'm probably headed down the wrong path, so I'll stop there...

    Thanks in advance for any input/guidance you can offer here!! [​IMG]
     
  3. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A direct quote from the information.

    The Barred Plymouth rock carries both E and B and both genes are used as the female side in commercial black sex linked crosses

    5). Almost any variety (color) of male ( not including white or barred ) can be used in a black sex linked cross.

    I just asked the person to read the info. They can always PM me and I will explain the info to them. Lots of people PM me with questions.

    Tim
     
  4. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The red dorking should fall into group 5 or wild type group. The male is wild type if he came from a brown stippled hen with a salmon colored breast ( black breasted red). He should of had chipmunk down color as a chick.

    The red dorking x delaware cross will work. Chick down will be similar to illustration 2 or with clearer down ( more ground color) with some brown striping.

    Red (male) x Silver gray (dorkings) = golden males and red females. This is a red sex linked cross- males have silver dorking down and females have red dorking down. The silver gray female must have a salmon colored breast.

    Tim
     
  5. Sazbaby

    Sazbaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks so much Tim, this is exactly what I was looking for. The red dorking male I'm referring to did have chipmunk down as a chick and came from either a silver gray, a red, or a colored dorking and either a red or silver gray roo... Does the fact that he's phenotypically red and not golden mean that he could only have had a red dorking mother and a red dorking father? Am I understanding this right? Just wanting to make sure that with this particular red dorking roo, his phenotype matches his genotype... Thanks again for your input, do you have a suggestion on a good site to self-educate on how the silver gray and red colors of the dorking breed are inherited? I'm on the verge of understanding but it will sink in better if I can see it in writing!
     
  6. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Red and silver (white) are sex linked. Males inherit one gene from both parents. Females inherit only one gene from the father. If a father carries a recessive gold allele and a silver allele he will produce silver females and gold (red) females. If he carries two silver alleles, every female chick will be silver; two recessive gold alleles every female chick will be gold (red).

    The red male dorking came from a mother that was red and a father that carried at least one gold allele. The father could have been red or hybrid/golden ( carries a silver and a gold allele).

    Dorkings should have chipmunk ( wild type) down. If they do not, then they are not carrying the correct kind of E locus allele. If he is the incorrect kind of E locus allele, he could produce females that do not have a salmon breast. Dorking females should have a salmon colored breast which is an expression of a purebred wild type female.

    Tim
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2013
  7. Sazbaby

    Sazbaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok... I think I'm starting to get it... thanks for the additional information. I'm going to have to go digest it now... ;)
     
  8. mikkles

    mikkles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have what may be a dumb question....can silkies have color sexlinks? For example, I have 2 of three with dark spots on their head...would that possibly be an indicator? thanks
     
  9. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Yes, you could create sex-linked silkes, but dark head spots are not a gender indicator. Most of us that raise silkies have no inclination for breeding in sex-linking. We already too often have difficulty finding homes/purchasers for extra cockerels; why on earth would we want to create birds that are not suitable for exhibition (mixed varieties), and on average at least half (cockerels) would be largely unwanted?
     
  10. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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