show quality speckled sussex ??

Discussion in 'Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the SOP' started by math ace, Dec 13, 2010.

  1. poltroon

    poltroon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Ironically, I might describe "horn" color as the color of clear mud, maybe with a dash of yellow and a bit of shading. [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  2. Orange Ribbon

    Orange Ribbon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I got all my big birds tagged and weighed. I only have a bathroom scale to use right now so it isn't too accurate, but gives us a round about figure. The rooster I showed before weighs 7 pounds, and he along with the rest still have feathers to come in, so that should add a few ounces at least.

    Don, I got a little notebook to carry around in my pocket and several big notebooks to keep records in at the shop. I will be getting a good scale soon that will be accurate. I have a good digital scale which I use to weigh bullets, broadheads and chemicals, but it only goes up to 5 pounds. I can probably use it for the younger birds.

    Here is the last of the big birds I'm going to show. I'll put up the smaller birds later after everyone has time to give their thoughts on this one. I have one other hen that looks about like this one except her tail stands up more.

    This is hen #001. The scales read 6 pounds. She is still molting.

    Right Side:
    [​IMG]

    Left Side:
    [​IMG]

    The Back:
    [​IMG]

    The tail from behind best as I could get with her up against the wall.
    [​IMG]

    Head/comb:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2011
  3. Orange Ribbon

    Orange Ribbon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I want to share with you how I tagged my birds. Since this is something that will benefit us as we breed our flocks we need to know about how to do it. Now, I'm not telling you how to do it, I'm just showing how I did. There may be some problems with what I did, and if so perhaps snowbird, or Fowlman can identify what would make it better. As far as these tags go, the only concern I have is whether they will get dinged up over time and make it hard to see the numbers/letters. I don't think they will, but I'll just have to watch and see.

    First off I used aluminum taxidermy tags. You can get these from any taxidermy supply company, and I looked in my WASCO catalog and last years price was $15.95 for 100. This means you can make 200 leg bands. You will need something to cut them with (scissors will work), an awl to punch holes or a drill will work, and some small zip ties. Here are the tags:
    [​IMG]

    You can mark them anyway you wish using an ink pen, awl, nail or what ever. Ink pen works best.
    [​IMG]

    The tag has two holes on one side. Cut the tag in half leaving one hole in each piece.
    [​IMG]

    Here is the tag cut in two and marked:
    [​IMG]

    Curl the tag into a band the size you desire. Cut off any access, but leave enough extra to poke a hole in it. Or you can just poke a hole and fold the excess inside the band.
    [​IMG]

    I placed the tag over a socket and punched the hole. It goes through very easy.
    [​IMG]

    I put a small yellow zip tie through the hole at one end. By using different color zip ties, you not only have an aluminum band with the numbers/letters you desire, but you can color code your birds. I like this because it is all in one piece and no need to have an extra zip tie or band on the chicken's leg.
    [​IMG]

    Lastly, wrap the band around the chicken leg, put the zip tie through the other hole, and zip it together. Now you have an aluminum tag with a color to go with it all in one. It is very easy, and you don't have to pay lots of money for tags, the numbers, and the tools to put them on. I marked my older birds 001 thru 006 with a yellow band to show they are from one flock. If I decide to make on of those birds a permanent member of another flock I can cut the zip tie and put on a different colored one. As I go through my younger birds and decide which pens they will get divided into they will each have their own personal number, yet will have a color for their group. Or you could put a different color on one special bird to identify it quickly. Lots of possibilities. Like I said, I don't know if this is best, it is just what I've come up with.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. fowlman01

    fowlman01 Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:I might worry about what it could do to the birds leg.

    Walt
     
  5. EMaker

    EMaker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Think of the color of cattle horn, or a light colored hoof on a horse; almost flesh colored, beige-ish, and sometimes with blackish shades or striping in it, but not yellow, and not solid black or grey. I think that's the coloring being described by 'horn'.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2011
  6. EMaker

    EMaker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2011
    Quote:You are so right about the slow growth. I can't speak yet on my flock's laying ability, but most of my girls are friendly and sweet. I have only one biter and one whiner - crazy to hear a chicken go "Ow! Ow! Ow!" when you pick her up.

    Do your Mt. Healthy birds have bent toes? Most of mine do. Been wondering if it's genetic or an incubator issue.

    Nope, none of my Mt. Healthy girls have bent toes, but it is indeed a flaw within the SS breed.
     
  7. math ace

    math ace Overrun With Chickens

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    Jacksonville, FL
    Quote:Nope, none of my Mt. Healthy girls have bent toes, but it is indeed a flaw within the SS breed.

    I do not believe crooked or bent toes is a common flaw with the ss. I have ss from 4 different sources and have never had a bent toe issue.
    It can be an incubator issue. It can also be genetics.... Since your birds came from one source, someone may not be doing a very good job of culling parents with deforminities.
     
  8. Orange Ribbon

    Orange Ribbon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Hey Walt,

    Thanks for bringing up the safety factor! That is always the number one thing when dealing with live animals. We don't want to hurt them. That was my first concern when trying this out. I left enough gap so the band moves freely up and down the section of leg. This is very soft, malleable stuff, not as ridged or sharp edged as it may appear in the pictures. The kinks you see in the pictures are not hard pieces of metal waiting to gouge the leg. Even that part bends so easily that say if the chickens had all its weight on it, it would just conform to the leg. I can't see where the birds could be cut, or get their legs pinched or poked with this stuff, nor anything about it any worse than using zip ties alone.

    Actually I see one thing better. If a zip tie band gets hooked on something, like a piece of wire or even small stick, the bird is going to be stuck there until something besides the zip tie breaks. But this aluminum tag will actually give at some point and tear free. That doesn't mean the stuff will tear right off. It is like the big metal sign posts along the interstate. At the bottom they have a section that is bolted down called the "breakaway." There is no way you can push or knock it over, but if the right amount of force hits it then the top separates from the bottom and flies loose. This keeps whoever is in the car from having a sudden stop and the rear bumper doesn't go through the back of their heads. I am pretty sure that if a chicken has this band get caught on something and struggles to get free, after a period of time the aluminum will begin to tear and will eventually free the bird.

    But I understand how some things need to be seen in person to understand the structure, fit, and design of something. I'm not trying to push this thing, again, just showing how I did it, and the benefits I see. I am not a chicken band expert and not trying to say my way is better than those who have been designing bird tags for a hundred years! HA! If I see any problems come up I will do away with the idea immediately and let you know. Thanks again, Walt. And if you see something about it specifically besides what I mentioned please let me know. I do not want to hurt my birds! [​IMG]
     
  9. fowlman01

    fowlman01 Overrun With Chickens

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    Sep 2, 2010
    Sonoma County CA
    Quote:Hey Walt,

    Thanks for bringing up the safety factor! That is always the number one thing when dealing with live animals. We don't want to hurt them. That was my first concern when trying this out. I left enough gap so the band moves freely up and down the section of leg. This is very soft, malleable stuff, not as ridged or sharp edged as it may appear in the pictures. The kinks you see in the pictures are not hard pieces of metal waiting to gouge the leg. Even that part bends so easily that say if the chickens had all its weight on it, it would just conform to the leg. I can't see where the birds could be cut, or get their legs pinched or poked with this stuff, nor anything about it any worse than using zip ties alone.

    Actually I see one thing better. If a zip tie band gets hooked on something, like a piece of wire or even small stick, the bird is going to be stuck there until something besides the zip tie breaks. But this aluminum tag will actually give at some point and tear free. That doesn't mean the stuff will tear right off. It is like the big metal sign posts along the interstate. At the bottom they have a section that is bolted down called the "breakaway." There is no way you can push or knock it over, but if the right amount of force hits it then the top separates from the bottom and flies loose. This keeps whoever is in the car from having a sudden stop and the rear bumper doesn't go through the back of their heads. I am pretty sure that if a chicken has this band get caught on something and struggles to get free, after a period of time the aluminum will begin to tear and will eventually free the bird.

    But I understand how some things need to be seen in person to understand the structure, fit, and design of something. I'm not trying to push this thing, again, just showing how I did it, and the benefits I see. I am not a chicken band expert and not trying to say my way is better than those who have been designing bird tags for a hundred years! HA! If I see any problems come up I will do away with the idea immediately and let you know. Thanks again, Walt. And if you see something about it specifically besides what I mentioned please let me know. I do not want to hurt my birds! [​IMG]

    No......that covers it. You have it in hand and I don't, but it sounds safe.

    Walt
     
  10. Gallusfarm

    Gallusfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Orange, you are so entertaining. I got a good chuckle out of BR-549 !! [​IMG] Keep up the good work !
     

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