Single comb blue/green egg layers?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by protodon, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. protodon

    protodon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nottingham,PA
    I'm not sure if I've ever posted this on here or if anyone has seen it before but this has always intrigued me and I wonder if it's actually possible. Can you have a single combed chicken that lays green or blue eggs and that breeds true?

    '5. Producing blue egg layers with single combs : cross leghorn hens (o+p+), (O represents the blue mutant, o+ signifies normal white), P - pea comb, p+ - single comb) with Araucana roosters 0P. All F1 hens should lay blue eggs and have pea combs,. Second, mate the F1 hens to Leghorn roosters. From the progeny select those pullets with pea combs as they should also lay blue eggs. When these pullets (Leghorn) begin to lay, cull any that lay white eggs (these will be few as they are crossovers). Third, continue this procedure for several generations, then mate hens with pea combs and that lay blue eggs to roosters with pea combs (nearly all of these will also carry the blue egg mutant). Through progeny testing of pea comb males that result from this mating, homozygous males can be located. They are progeny tested by matings to Leghorn hens. Homozygous males will produce only daughters laying blue eggs - test a set of 10 or more daughters per male. These males can then be used in the population to produce a homozygous stock of basically Leghorn ancestry and performance but laying blue eggs. '

    here is the link for this: http://www.utilitypoultry.co.uk/araucana.shtml
     
  2. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Yes. There is about a 3% chance of a bird inheriting the blue egg gene and the not-pea comb gene from a parent who has both the blue egg and pea comb genes on one chromosome and both the not-pea comb and not-blue egg gene on the other. One the new pair of alleles are set on a chromosome, THAT pair of genes are linked, meaning that for their offspring, both these allleles will be inherited together 97% of the time.
     
  3. protodon

    protodon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Then I wonder why aren't there any single combed blue or green egged layers out there? Is it because no one has actually taken the time to develop one. Seems like people on here try to develop many different variations of chickens, so someone somewhere has to have tried. All one would need is one breeding pair with these genes set to make more.
     
  4. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    There are people who have worked on it from time to time, but I don't think most folks consider a single comb to be a necessarily desirable trait, or perhaps I should rephrase that to most folks not considering a pea comb to be an undesirable trait worth breeding out.
     
  5. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Cross #1 male (white egg type) x female (blue egg type) = F1 blue egg laying hens and males that carry a blue egg shell allele. Every bird will be heterozygous for pea comb. Pea comb is incompletely dominant so you will get some wierd looking single combs. I worked with the blue egg allele and white leghorns for six years.

    Cross #2 leghorn ( any white egg layer)male X F1 females or F1 male x leghorn hens = F2 1/2 of the F2 will be single combed and the other half will be heterozygous pea combed. There is more to the pea combed and single combed inheritence than two genes. It was difficult to get a single comb that was normal looking from the crosses and the same thing goes for the pea comb.

    You will have to hatch 100- 200 F2 chicks for the single comb and blue egg trait to show up. It will be easy to determine if the F2 females have a single comb and lay a blue egg.

    Then cross the single comb and blue egg laying female with a leghorn male = back cross or BC offspring 1/4 of the males will have a single comb and carry a blue egg shell allele.

    Then test cross the BC offspring males to detemine if they carry a blue egg shell allele.

    Once you get a male that carries a blue egg shell gene, cross him with your blue egg laying single combed female.

    Every offspring will have to be tested to determine if they carry two blue egg shell genes. Once you get a male and female bird that carries two blue egg shell genes you have accomplished your goal.


    I hatched hundreds of chicks and never produced a single combed female that layed a blue egg. You could get results after three years or so and then again it may take longer. I am not trying to rain on your parade;just being straight forward.


    Tim
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2011
  6. Hi! I have a blue barred single comb girl here that lays a green egg. She's the only one I've hatched (that I know of) from my barred green-egger project.
    I didn't know she was such a rare bird.
    [​IMG]
    Lisa
     
  7. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Million dollar bird [​IMG] well, valuable in any case.
     
  8. HBuehler

    HBuehler Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 30, 2009
    Lebanon TN
    We had several here but I sold them because of all the grief about single comb EE not laying blue/green.People hear that and won't buy the chicks even though you show them the hens in question laying green and the pappa roo is a true ameraucana there is no way to get brown or white eggs.
    If it were only 3% then by gosh I must have had the most rare EE flock around since we had a pen full and not one laid a brown or white egg..that said we have had pea comb EE lay white eggs which are the leghorn true Ameraucana which is actually what I was working on...white egg layer without so much comb and some color-mine are all blue
     
  9. Highlander

    Highlander Tartan Terror

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    Cream Legbars have a single comb and lay a blue-green egg. I believe they are not commonplace in the US yet though but Greenfire farms has or is in the process of obtaining some?
     
  10. phasianidae

    phasianidae Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:x2
     

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