Smelly beak?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Want2Bfarm, Oct 30, 2014.

  1. Want2Bfarm

    Want2Bfarm Out Of The Brooder

    15
    0
    22
    Sep 4, 2014
    I have been reading a lot of posts on here. I had a RIR that had an infection that started in her eye and I tried many things to help her. But lost her the other day. Yesterday, I picked up my Buff rooster and he had some stuff(hard snot) on his beak. And it smelled bad. I checked the rest and 2 others have beaks that smell bad. I saw a post or 2 on people talking about smelling the beak but do not remember what it was about? They have no signs of being sick. They eat and drink. Their poop looks like poop. They are all active...Chase me around the yard for their treats.
     
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Hatchaholic Extrordinaire Premium Member

    12,152
    6,577
    521
    Mar 27, 2012
    Vermont
    My Coop
    That sounds like coryza. Swollen, runny, bubbly eyes and bad smelling nasal discharge are classic symptoms. Once the chicken has this disease and is treated, they are still a carrier for life and give it to other chickens that have never had it. The best treatment for it is Tylan, which you can find at Tractor Supply and most other feed stores.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2014
  3. Want2Bfarm

    Want2Bfarm Out Of The Brooder

    15
    0
    22
    Sep 4, 2014
    Tylan 50? And that gets in mixed in the water? How much?
     
  4. Pyxis

    Pyxis Hatchaholic Extrordinaire Premium Member

    12,152
    6,577
    521
    Mar 27, 2012
    Vermont
    My Coop
    Give it orally, not in the water, 1/2 cc for five days. Or you can inject it into the breast, 1/2 cc for three days instead of five, because it is absorbed easier this way.

    Incidentally I wanted to add that now that your birds have this disease, you cannot give them away or sell any of them. That would just be spreading the disease and would be irresponsible and just passing on the pain and difficulty to another unsuspecting flock owner. Not that I think you were going to do this, but just in case someone else reads this thread in their research if their own birds get sick I want them to know.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2014
  5. Want2Bfarm

    Want2Bfarm Out Of The Brooder

    15
    0
    22
    Sep 4, 2014
    Would never give my birds away, regardless. They make me laugh and are a great stress reliever at the end of the day. So I should treat all 5? Now what do I do if I want to add a couple more to the flock?
     
  6. Pyxis

    Pyxis Hatchaholic Extrordinaire Premium Member

    12,152
    6,577
    521
    Mar 27, 2012
    Vermont
    My Coop
    If you add more to the flock, they'll eventually get it from the other birds and you'll have to treat them. I would treat them all, because the disease spreads and chances are they all have it and just some aren't yet showing symptoms. Or you could wait until they are showing symptoms, but they'll eventually catch it, what with them all living in close quarters and sharing food and water.
     
  7. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,238
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    There's a misconception about Infectious Coryza that once it's treated and runs its course, birds will never get it again but will remain carriers. Remaining surviving birds ARE carriers and will always have the disease and will ALWAYS be sick for the rest of their existing lives and will spread it to other birds, if they survive. It's not called "Infectious" for nothing. Depopulation (politically correct) or culling (old school) an INFECTIOUS Coryza flock is required. Culling sick birds is proper flock management as well as disinfection/sanitation. If you only knew what this disease (and others) do internally to birds, you'd put them out of their misery in a heartbeat. Look up photos on the internet if you wish. Deciding to spend alot of money to treat sick birds for the rest of their lives is a personal choice. Egg production will most likely stop altogether. The disease will build resistance to antibiotics, requiring more powerful antibiotics to treat (not cure) sick birds creating more stress on the chickens system. Then there's withdrawal times with antibiotics to deal with, even IF they are laying. Then you MUST practice strict biosecurity; no new birds in, no birds out. Since Mycoplasma Gallisepticum (MG) can accompany Infectious Coryza; MG can be passed through eggs. Strict biosecurity would also prevent the giving away or selling of eggs to be hatched. A closed flock of endlessly treating sick birds is a waste of time and money, not to mention the suffering the birds experience.
    http://www.unitedpeafowlassociation.org/InfectiousCoryza.html
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  8. Want2Bfarm

    Want2Bfarm Out Of The Brooder

    15
    0
    22
    Sep 4, 2014
    I want to thank everyone for the info. I am new to this. I have had them for only 3 months and got them at 6 weeks old. They are my pets. I am not raising them. or selling eggs. I could care less if they ever lay. I am going to try the tylan. and keep a close eye on them. If any of them from now on get sick, then I will go to the extreme. It is just real hard to do that today when they don't show any other signs of being sick.
     
  9. Want2Bfarm

    Want2Bfarm Out Of The Brooder

    15
    0
    22
    Sep 4, 2014
    [​IMG]

    This is what my RIR had before she passed.
     
  10. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,238
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Treating Infectious Coryza requires either using sulmet or sulfadimethoxine in conjunction with tylan injectable at the same time.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by