So disgusted....

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chickenzoo, Sep 11, 2013.

  1. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    As many birds as I've raised and advice given...I am at my wits end with this situation. I have a few breeds of chicks that do fine for the first week...then get thin..weak and die..dispite using Corid....using antibiotics...different feed...different bedding...cleaning incubator...different enviroment...raising with only that breed together...brooding with other chicks...giving denaguard...giving probiotics...save a chick...ACV..changing feeds...medicated...non medicated..grit..no grit....
    As I sit here watching this little chick die after a weeks care and nothing helping...I feel like never hatching again...
    The breeds are my Tolbunts...My Cuckoo D'anvers...My Cuckoo Bantam Phoenix. ..and on occasion a Silkie or Serama. Anyone else have this issue.....I'm out of ideas...
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    Talk to your county extension agent about getting one autopsied. In some states that is pretty inexpensive and in some it’s not. Find out the cost and how you would have to handle the body when it dies so you know what to do.

    I don’t know what is going on. Since it’s different breeds it sounds like a disease and not genetics. I know that has to be frustrating.
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    I don't have that much experience to be an expert, but it sounds like it could be either the rare breeds you are hatching are just difficult to hatch, or there is some bacterial or viral problem with the hatching eggs or the incubator. Having incubated only a few times in 3 different incubators, I know how difficult it is to clean and disinfect everything inside them without damaging it. Also in my reading about incubation, I remember that some of the university websites have talked about infected or poor quality hatching eggs as being the problem many times. Why not take a few hatching eggs of a very easy breed such as German New Hampshires, and try to experiment with them? I feel silly trying to give someone with your experience advice, but I had great success this year hatching HRIR and GNH hatching eggs that had been shipped. The lady that sold the GNH said it was hard to mess them up because they were so easy, and she was right.
     

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