Soundproofing a henhouse

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Micklemoose, Apr 25, 2011.

  1. Micklemoose

    Micklemoose Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2011
    My wife and I will be proud new home-owners come friday (closing on our first house). I really want to keep chickens for eggs and to teach our kids about where their food comes from (ideally). My wife wants Silkies because they are 'soooo cuuute'.

    Now the problem is that the town we are moving to does not allow chickens under any circumstances. We will have a large yard and I know I can build an inconspicuous henhouse that looks like a garden shed, but that leaves the problem of clucking and bucking noises coming from said hen-house. The furthest I can put the shed from a neighboring house is around 150ft. That combined with the fact that silkies are supposedly pretty quiet should be enough to not alert the neighbors (who, to forestall any comments in this direction, I strongly doubt would be too happy about us keeping chickens). However, just to be safe I was thinking about soundproofing the henhouse using some spare insullation foam I can get my hands on.

    The question is, is it possible to provide all the ventillation needed through some open eaves, or will I need more, thus negating any benefit from the sound-proofing.

    Another Idea I had was to make the floor out of metal grates and elevating the shed a foot or so off the ground for insullation that way in the hopes of the ground deadening most of the noise, although I have no idea where I would get my hands on some cheap metal grates without vandalizing some bridges in the area.

    Any ideas?
     
  2. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    The fewer number of birds in the larger amount of space would be your best bet. And of course it depends on how long your eaves are as to whether or not eave ventilation would be adequate. If you get hot summers in your area, probably not. And I'm assuming that your chickens would have a run?? So there's really no good way to soundproof a run...

    Oh...and congrats on your new home [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2011
  3. urbanfarmette

    urbanfarmette Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 5, 2011
    Southeastern Wisconsin
    not sure if this would work in your space but you could put up a panel or two of privacy fence to block some of the noise. otherwise, maybe some tall hedges around the hen house? anything to absorb some of those sound waves or direct them upwards. the privacy fence wouldn't have to be continuous. you could just put up two panels forming a corner facing the neighbor's house. tack on some wire mesh and grow some morning glories up it so it looks decorative.

    jessica
     
  4. Micklemoose

    Micklemoose Out Of The Brooder

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    Thought we might get away with not having a run if we had a large enough space. 6-8 bantams in a two level 4x6foot space would seem to be pretty good if we gave them access to a window on the second level.

    I know it isn't exactly the ideal chicken situation, but we are cold and rainy up here for most of the year, so they aren't missing out on much.
     
  5. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    I would do a lot of research on silkies. Many folks talk about how they don't do well roosting or climbing chicken ladders. The people who have mixed flocks seem to have better luck with both of these, maybe because they have "role models"???? So I'd be wary of using a two level shelter with silkies if your aim is for them to use both levels.
    Also, without a window at both levels, the bottom level would stay darkish, so no matter the breed, it would likely not get used.
    Finally, with no run, I would aim for 10 sq. ft. per bird. My silkies have 4 sq. ft. indoor plus 10 sq. ft. run space per bird. More space = happier birds and easier clean-up. So if you decide to go with your set-up, I'd cut the number of birds you projected starting with in half, at least until you see how things work out, JMO. You can always add birds later if things go smoothly.
     
  6. seagetts

    seagetts New Egg

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    Apr 26, 2011
    I used to have chickens here in Florida where the heat gets pretty bad. I had a nice area for them to roam during the day and never had a problem with overheating. My coop was ventilated about 6 inches from under the roof. I also raised ducks and turkeys but in different areas. I agree with teach1rusl comments. I work for a company that manufactures sound abatement products. If the noise is a concern we have a product called acoustifence that attaches to a fence and works well. you can check it out at acoustiblok.com We have testimonies on the site from bird owners. Good luck on the new home.
     
  7. Micklemoose

    Micklemoose Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2011
    Thanks for the comments!
     
  8. latebloomer

    latebloomer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 10, 2011
    green mountain state
    how about some white noise? need a fountain, waterfall or other water feature?
     
  9. Micklemoose

    Micklemoose Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2011
    What I really should do is get 5 or 6 terriers. Town says they are ok even though chickens are not. I could then offer my neighbors the choice of keeping the terriers or switching to chickens. I wonder what they would think then [​IMG]
     
  10. GiddyMoon

    GiddyMoon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Tucson, AZ
    Please remember, your chickens need sun, fresh air, exercise, bugs, grass, etc. to be truly healthy to give you healthy eggs. Keeping them in a soundproof, airproof box is not going to be good for them.
     
    1 person likes this.

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