Starting Chicks in October/November

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by epatullo, Sep 24, 2014.

  1. epatullo

    epatullo Just Hatched

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    Feb 26, 2013
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    First off, I apologize if this is a repeat post/question but I looked around for a bit and was unsuccessful find a related post. I'll begin by laying some groundwork of my situation. My wife, I, and our four kids are moving into our "new" house on 5 acres in the central part of Minnesota. We all were looking for some more land and room to roam so we could raise our children outside of the typical neighborhood suburbia. Along with that desire is getting into homesteading and of course chickens. We've wanted chickens for many years and couldn't in our old home area. The place we are moving into has an existing shed (approximately 8'x20'). The current owners currently have it divided three ways. The first half is the typical shed portion and the remaining half is split length-wise into two divides. One have is used for two goats and the other was used as a dog kennel. Both sides have a "doggy door" giving access to a equally fenced in area with concrete apron. My intention is to raise chickens in one or both of those halves and have them outside of the coop the majority of the time since there are no immediate neighbors other than the heavy woods.
    I guess the big question that remains is this. Am I able to starting raising chicks come mid-October November? I really am too excited to wait for Spring and I read a lot online but now I am seeking the forum's opinion on the matter. The way I see it by the time there are able to go outside it will be too cold for them to have any desire to and the would basically not get out until Spring. What are everyone's thoughts and opinions? Any other advice is certainly appreciated.

    Thanks again!
     
  2. Dad of the coop

    Dad of the coop Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 4, 2014
    Yes you can. The only thing that you would do differently is keep the in the brooder longer and maybe give them a heat lamp in the coop when they first go outside.
     
  3. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

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    Tn
    x2. Or, skip the whole brooding deal and start with some point of lay pullets. If you get them locally, they should already be acclimated to the weather.
    While I don't see anywhere near the harsh winters you have in Minnesota, I hatch chicks pretty much all year round here. We do see some -teens in the dead of winter, and even my newly hatched chicks do well with their 250W bulb. I brood outside, by the way. Never in my house, I can't stand the dusty mess!
    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2014

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