Stop Worming as a preventative!!

RoosterML

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Ok now that I have your attention. The reason I wanted to bring this to your attention is because I am not sure many people may be aware of how inexpensive the test actually is or they may not be aware that you do not need to have the test done through or by a vet.
I am talking about a Fecal Float Test to determine if your birds have worms or coccidiosis. Finds your local animal diagnostic laboratory call them and ask them if they will do the test for you.
Here's an example local vet wanted $55 for a fecal float test. So I searched online and came across UCONN that is my closest laboratory. I called and asked about the test. Answer in short $15. So my question is to everyone why are you still doing "general worming" as a preventative? To me it's a no brainier that before I give any chemical to my flock I would like to do my due diligence first.
So the point of this thread is to put some information out there that you do have other options to giving your animals unnecessary treatments first.
Heck I wouldn't see why you couldn't mail in from across the country to have the test done if needed.
Hope this may help someone.
 

ChickenLeg

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Does the test for $15 cover one bird or all the 50 birds? Many people have different pins spread out amongst their property, so one test for an entire flock doesnt work. With different outbreaks in different pins & lots of birds the price could be enormous.

Much cheaper to just preventatively treat them, especially with coccidiosis, I'd rather treat them 4 times a year than have 1 out break ever. Ive had outbreaks of coccidiosis over the years and if youre just 1 day late of determining it was coccidiosis your birds can start dropping dead.

Also its very easy and fast to add preventatives to the water when you fill up the waterers in the morning. Compared to getting a fecal from birds in every pin, could be a big hassle. Cheers
 
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Lady Lionheart

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The oldest of my pullets are around 22 weeks. My question, will it harm them to deworm them? My mom keeps telling me that I should have already did it, but I was unsure. They show no signs of worms. But.. I am not really sure of the signs??? They are more my pets and I would like them to be as healthy as possible. I am on the fence about this subject. Can anyone help me with what I should do?
 

Wyorp Rock

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The oldest of my pullets are around 22 weeks. My question, will it harm them to deworm them? My mom keeps telling me that I should have already did it, but I was unsure. They show no signs of worms. But.. I am not really sure of the signs??? They are more my pets and I would like them to be as healthy as possible. I am on the fence about this subject. Can anyone help me with what I should do?
If at all possible, getting a fecal float to check for worms is the best way to go.
Why treat for worms, if you don't have them.

For coccidiosis overloads and outbreaks in chicks, it would be better to go ahead and treat them. Trying to find a vet or waiting on testing, you may be too late in treating them.
 

Lady Lionheart

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If at all possible, getting a fecal float to check for worms is the best way to go.
Why treat for worms, if you don't have them.

For coccidiosis overloads and outbreaks in chicks, it would be better to go ahead and treat them. Trying to find a vet or waiting on testing, you may be too late in treating them.
I have had to treat them with corid before. So I am familiar with that. For the other types of worms, the best approach is making sure they actually have them? That was kinda of my thoughts on it. Thank you.
 

casportpony

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I'm all for *routine* fecals. One random negative fecal doesn't mean you shouldn't de-worm your bird, it just means that test didn't find any eggs.

There was one person a few years ago that learned this the hard way and almost lost their bird. Their bird was on deaths door so they took some poop to the vet for a fecal float and no worm eggs or coccidia were. It was suggested that they have another fecal done and that one found tons of capillaria and coccidia.
 

RoosterML

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Does the test for $15 cover one bird or all the 50 birds many people own? Many people have different pins spread out amongst their property, so one test for an entire flock doesnt work. With different outbreaks in different pins & lots of birds the price could be enormous.

Much cheaper to just preventatively treat them, especially with coccidiosis, I'd rather treat them 4 times a year than have 1 out break ever. Ive had outbreaks of coccidiosis over the years and if youre just 1 day late of determining it was coccidiosis your birds can start dropping dead.

Also its very easy and fast to add preventatives to the water when you fill up the waterers in the morning. Cheers
Hi,
I knew the question you ask would come up so I figured I would respond to the question as oppose to preemptively address it in original post.
I am going to use example numbers to answer your question.
Lets say you have 5 pens of 10 birds each, total of 50 birds as you ask about.
You could address it multiple ways.
Test #1-
Gather poop from multiple dirds in each pen, mix poop together and send in a test for each pen. That would be a total of 5 test resulting in $75 total testing fees.
Not bad for 50 birds.
You now would have the results that will tell you which pen you may have an issue with. Treat only that pen and not the others.

Test #2
Collect a small amount of poop from a few birds in each pen mix together and send in for one overall test.
1 test Total $15 dollars.
Results will give you an idea what's going on overall. At this point treat all or send in as you would for test#1 to narrow it down.

Test#3
You have a questionable bird. Send in poop for just that bird.
1 test $15

There is no one answer fits all. Everyone will do what's best for them.
You can also refine the testing anyway you like. To me information is key.

For me I want to know what is going on in my flock and the only way to get factual information is to have testing done. Again this tread was to inform others that I believe there is an economical way to test your birds so you can determine whether or not to treat your birds.

Also it's the same test for other animals cat,dogs,ect.
 

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