Suggested Humidity Levels Question

Keeperoflock

Songster
Mar 10, 2018
161
158
126
Central Indiana
I have a humidity monitor in my coop. It's my first winter with them and was wondering what the best range of humidity inside the coop would be.

I have 15 7 mo. old pullets. I have good ventilation, 2x4 roosts and have a poop board. The coop is wooden with a wooden floor, 8x8 square with ceiling of 9 foot. The floor has plexiglass for cleaning and half way up the walls also has plexiglass. I don't have issues (so far) with moisture.

For bedding, I currently use wood chips but will be switching to straw for better warmth. The coop is not insulated and I don't think I'll be insulating it either. I'm in Indiana and while it gets plenty cold at times, I just don't think it's necessary but will keep an eye on them. I will be using a heat bulb when I observe behavior that warrants it.

Thanks in advance!
 

Folly's place

Enabler
9 Years
Sep 13, 2011
22,990
37,600
1,096
southern Michigan
How about some photos? You are pushing the limit on birds for your coop size, and will need plenty of ventilation, and a nice (covered!) run to make it work out for the coming winter.
It shouldn't be more humid than ambient; you can't make it dryer, so let that be your guide.
In my experience, pure straw will be a bigger mess, and harder to handle, then shavings, or a combination of materials. Some straw, dry leaves, shavings, and stuff will work fine too. I mostly use the bagged shavings from the local feed store, [preferably the 'fines'.
Mary
 

Keeperoflock

Songster
Mar 10, 2018
161
158
126
Central Indiana
How about some photos? You are pushing the limit on birds for your coop size, and will need plenty of ventilation, and a nice (covered!) run to make it work out for the coming winter.
It shouldn't be more humid than ambient; you can't make it dryer, so let that be your guide.
In my experience, pure straw will be a bigger mess, and harder to handle, then shavings, or a combination of materials. Some straw, dry leaves, shavings, and stuff will work fine too. I mostly use the bagged shavings from the local feed store, [preferably the 'fines'.
Mary

The run is 14' by 12' covered run and faces the south. For ventilation, I have drilled holes, many many of them above their heads and keep the window that is opposite the holes (for cross ventilation) open at the top (which is also above their heads) about 4 inches.
 

Keeperoflock

Songster
Mar 10, 2018
161
158
126
Central Indiana
The run is 14' by 12' covered run and faces the south. For ventilation, I have drilled holes, many many of them above their heads and keep the window that is opposite the holes (for cross ventilation) open at the top (which is also above their heads) about 4 inches.

I will try to get pictures of it tomorrow as we are doing a lot of winterizing this weekend.
 

Folly's place

Enabler
9 Years
Sep 13, 2011
22,990
37,600
1,096
southern Michigan
Aart has links to some good articles about coop ventilation, and most of them recommend about one sq. ft. of opening per bird!
I do hope you have hardware cloth over those openings too, and with a roofed run, you could leave the main coop door open all or most of the time, for ventilation and access. If it's predator proof, anyway.
Mary
 
Last edited:

Keeperoflock

Songster
Mar 10, 2018
161
158
126
Central Indiana
Aart has links to some good articles about coop ventilation, and most of them recommend about one sq. ft. of opening per bird!
I do hope you have hardware clothe over those openings too, and with a roofed run, you could leave the main coop door open all or most of the time, for ventilation and access. If it's predator proof, anyway.
Mary[/QUOTE

The run has multi-level roosts, a ladder and a large tree limb for playing on. They are healthy egg-laying factories.

Hubby is putting in a smaller door at the bottom of the main door to keep the wind out and will give them access.

Yes, predator proofing is done and I do leave the door open when the weather isn't windy. It's forecasted to be quite windy and getting colder tomorrow.
 

Keeperoflock

Songster
Mar 10, 2018
161
158
126
Central Indiana

The run is 12x14 and faces the south with multi-level roosts, a ladder, and a large limb for jumping around on. I watch them from our sun room and they are playing and jumping around all the time.

They also get free range time every day but only if we are out there with them.

Hubby is putting in a smaller door at the bottom of the main door.

Security and predator proofing is well taken care of and we have a trail cam and motion sensitive solar lights for security.
 

jthornton

Free Ranging
Aug 30, 2017
4,132
7,837
512
Poplar Bluff, MO
My Coop
My Coop
I have a humidity monitor in my coop. It's my first winter with them and was wondering what the best range of humidity inside the coop would be.
I have 15 7 mo. old pullets. I have good ventilation, 2x4 roosts and have a poop board. The coop is wooden with a wooden floor, 8x8 square with ceiling of 9 foot. The floor has plexiglass for cleaning and half way up the walls also has plexiglass.

I also use a BME180 weather chip in my coop and you want the humidity level to be no higher than outside (you can't get lower). You need 15 square feet of ventilation for that many birds. Beware they will get bigger lol I had to move my roosts farther away from the walls twice. Photos if you can.

JT
 

jreardon1918

Crowing
Jul 13, 2016
837
1,467
276
Southeast, MA
My Coop
My Coop
We have 7 hens in a 4x8 coop. Due to our run configuration, we can leave the two windows open year round . Plastic the run and we keep out snow, and allow ventilation in a smallish coop. See my build article. Plus we have gable vents and a ridge vent. We have a monitor in the coop that shows inside the coop temp and humidity. Ocaisionally I move the monitor to the run to make sure that the humidity is close to outside.
 

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