Tell me why you keep Roosters...

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by cestial225, Sep 7, 2013.

  1. cestial225

    cestial225 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Right now I have 4 roosters in my flock. They are all fine, not fighting but I really see no reason to keep them all. I am thinking for protection purposes and so I can have hatching eggs in the spring I should keep one but is there a reason to keep more? Right now they just seem to eat a lot and they dont earn their food like the hens do so whats the point right?
     
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  2. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Hawk protection and keeping flock tighter. Keep one in pen as backup and get rid of other two.
     
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  3. Ciqala

    Ciqala Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I bought 12 chicks, all were suppose to be pullets but I ended up with three cockerels. I rehomed one, who hit the jack pot of good homes and I get to see him with his new flock on a regular basis [​IMG] I came VERY close to rehoming another of my cockerels, but knew he'd end up on a dinner plate and I ended up keeping him instead. I didn't plan on having roosters but I've found I absolutely adore them. So I have 2 roosters to 9 hens, my roosters get along great they only had one instance of chest bumping {at about 4mths of age} and that was it. I find the hens are more mean to each other actually.

    I love the dynamics the roosters bring to the flock, the way they look after the hens and get all excited calling the hens over when they find a treat. Not to mention how gorgeous they are. I had a lot of concerns about my hen to rooster ratio, but the boys worked out who's hens are who's and pretty much stick to mating just their own hens. My hens aren't looking worse for the wear and the boys are gentle in their mating. So for now, it's working fantastically for us. And it's pretty neat in my opinion to watch them work together in their flock duties.

    This is my first time with chickens and I followed the raising rooster advice on this forum seriously and ended up with two very respectful, laid back roosters. I never worry about turning my back to either of the boys. Now I wouldn't want chickens without roosters, I think they're the best [​IMG]
     
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  4. chfite

    chfite Chillin' With My Peeps

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    As the roosters get older, their behavior may well change for the worse. Dominance is dominance, and may not work out well in the long run. Just keep an eye on them and prepare to reduce the ranks of roosters.

    Chris
     
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  5. Paganrose

    Paganrose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I kept roosters at frist for baby chicks. I have discovered they are invaluable when free ranging! They will sacrifice their life to protect their flock and sound an alarm at the first sign of danger. This alows the hens and chicks to find cover, preventing the whole flock being maimed.
     
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  6. Paganrose

    Paganrose Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Some of my mild mannered roos are 4 years old. Never had any people aggression with them. The moment they are they are stew.

    If however you see aggression towards people in a roo deal with him before it breeds or your next generation will be just as nasty.
     
  7. bbishop

    bbishop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a maran rooster the reason why I have him because is for protection for the girls and the eggs I sell my coustomets say they taste better fertil:)
     
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  8. cestial225

    cestial225 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was just attacked by a tiny little bantam roo. He came up behind me out of nowhere. I am so sick of having to watch my back and I won't allow my children outside when the chickens are out. I told hubby to cull the two roos that have shown aggression this week. My maran roo has never shown aggression so he is safe for now and my ee roo is still pretty young so he is safe for now.but at this point I am considering having a hen only flock if these two roos turn on me. If I want to hatch in the spring I guess I will have to buy eggs from somewhere.
     
  9. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Small children and roosters don't mix well. I'd never hold my kids prisoner on their own property due to the possibility of an animal attacking them, roosters gotta go. Day old chicks are a great way to add to a flock, that way you (usually) get all females and don't have to deal with this rooster thing again down the road. Chickens in a backyard flock are meant to be enjoyed, not stressed over.
     
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  10. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    I, too, have mature roosters over four years old. *I* have established dominance over the roosters so they are respectful to me and visitors. I have had as many as 16 roos/cockerels at a time; only one cockerel had to be permanently culled for meanness. Most of the others were re-homed without my having to warn the new owners of any aggression. (Actually, I had to reassure them there was little reason to fear the birds. My dominant rooster Carl teaches them to respect people. I reinforce that rule if necessary.)

    Granted, it's not ideal to have a high rooster/hen ratio, but it's not the "sure fire way to have a rooster kill another rooster" I keep reading or hearing about.

    Right now I have two mature roosters and about ten cockerels growing up. I wouldn't want a flock without at least two roosters - one is a backup should something happen to the other. Roosters "manage" their flocks, stopping hen fights, alerting the flock to danger, and sometimes even sacrificing themselves to save the flock from a predator.

    I didn't get chickens for eggs, anyway, so my idea of "productivity" doesn't exclude non-layers.. I got my first 8 chickens - supposedly pullet chickes - for bug reduction, free fertilizer and something interesting to watch in the yard. Getting eggs was a bonus. (Now it's a business, albeit a teensy tiny one.)

    Some people cannot keep even one rooster due to local restrictions. I feel sorry they never get to enjoy the interactions between the flock members with roosters to rule the roosts. ;)
     
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