The Buckeye Thread

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Happy Chooks, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. buckeyechicken

    buckeyechicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    Both of my rooster have about 1/4 inch space from the crown of the head to the peas and I am calling that a large comb, one has the defined rows of peas and the other is not so defined, my hens all have combs that rest on the crown of the head but the rows are not as defined as the roosters so should I pick out the best hen with a defined row of peas and work with the defined rooster (Larger comb) which is liking in other areas to meet the SOP for the comb and get that under control and them move to other parts that do not meet standards.
     
  2. Minniechickmama

    Minniechickmama Senora Pollo Loco

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    I have been curious about the weather effecting the combs on some of my birds. I see pictures of Wyandottes for example, that have huge combs on them and mine just don't get like that. I have BLRWs from 3 strains here and none of them are overly large combed.
    Also, my Black Minorcas, compared to the other SC breeds/varieties I have here have big combs and wattles, but I see others that are huge.
    The Bucks, I see are very consistent in comb size with the strain I am breeding regardless of time of the year that they are hatched and reared.
     
  3. Minniechickmama

    Minniechickmama Senora Pollo Loco

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    Go to the SOP pg. 115 shows a difference in combs sizes for Leghorns. Even though they are using a different breed and comb type, I think it is a good guideline to use for comparing comb size. It is more in relation to the size of the head. Again a question of balance and proportion, in my opinion.
     
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  4. Minniechickmama

    Minniechickmama Senora Pollo Loco

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    If you have no other traits to concentrate on, then I would look much closer at the comb, but I would first look at the best body type. If you have fluffy birds or poor leg color or 'off' wing carriage, etc, then I would start really culling the combs. Like was mentioned, combs are on the lower end of importance. That is not to say that you want to ignore completely, just know it isn't as important a trait that the overall bird's type. If I had a hen that had a perfect comb but only weighed 4-pounds. I would cull her.
     
  5. Minniechickmama

    Minniechickmama Senora Pollo Loco

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    Here is a comb we can look at, and feel free to comment:
    What I like about this comb is the nice definition of the rows of "peas". I like the size enough, but would like to see it just a little larger
    [​IMG]
    However, when you look at it from the side, I really dislike how it comes up almost to a point in the back with a drop down to the skull again.
    [​IMG]
    This bird was culled, not for his comb, but because he completely lacked undercolor and he was not filling out in width or weight as I expect my Bucks to.
     
  6. cgmccary

    cgmccary Chillin' With My Peeps

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    On combs size:

    I think if the comb is not grossly small nor grossly large and if generally, the pea comb is medium in size relative to the head, then all is well if it otherwise is correct. Size of the comb here is somewhat subjective.

    I have not seen that combs generally are the big problem when it comes to Buckeyes. I suspect what Wynette says about different climates making combs larger or smaller would apply to the Buckeye's comb as well. I do not understand why it wouldn't. I am not at the point where I am selecting just on the basis of a comb, but I have only been breeding Buckeyes for 7 years.

    IMHO, the problem I see with some Buckeyes that is not as easy to fix is in the bodies of some present lines.

    Edited by staff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 21, 2013
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  7. slfarms

    slfarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    On combs size:

    I think if the comb is not grossly small nor grossly large and if generally, the pea comb is medium in size relative to the head, then all is well if it otherwise is correct. Size of the comb here is somewhat subjective.

    I have not seen that combs generally are the big problem when it comes to Buckeyes. I suspect what Wynette says about different climates making combs larger or smaller would apply to the Buckeye's comb as well. I do not understand why it wouldn't. I am not at the point where I am selecting just on the basis of a comb, but I have only been breeding Buckeyes for 7 years.

    IMHO, the problem I see with some Buckeyes that is not as easy to fix is in the bodies of some present lines.

    I agree that type and color needs to be worked on prior to combs in the buckeye lines.

    Edited by staff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 22, 2013
  8. Minniechickmama

    Minniechickmama Senora Pollo Loco

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    I can see in my own flock that overall the size is very good and birds dress out nicely like the one in the right of this photo, but have some that are just not great specimens coming from the same exact parents. Sometimes I believe it comes from an individual birds genetic coding to be thrifty or not. Most of us already know that you can get variation with offspring, if you have to show quality birds that you mate together, the likeliness of getting SQ birds out of them is higher than mating two average birds, but is no guarantee. Just as the possibility of breeding two average birds can produce real winners once in a while. It is really a numbers game more than anything.
    I have Blue varieties of a few breeds and after a couple of years of breeding, I am looking at the color and not really crazy with what I am getting. I have done research and found that a key to keeping good color is to utilize the Splash birds for improvement in color. So, I asked Duane Urch about that this summer, "What do you do to improve the color of Blues?" His reply, "Hatch a lot of them." Sometimes it isn't some secret 'recipe' but merely a numbers game. Having good foundation and knowing what traits to breed and when you should and shouldn't introduce new blood is all going to help you with all of that.

    Edited by staff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 22, 2013
  9. homeworkin

    homeworkin Out Of The Brooder

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    I love these great discussions about combs and such. I will need to be selecting my breeders from the 15 Buckeyes I have. My younger birds will be 24 weeks in January so I'll need to know what I am looking at when that rolls around. For me, how fast they gain is important so I will also be recording weights in a few weeks.

    Good info on the blues as well. I have 4 birds from a breeder who purchased them directly from Foley and a cockerel descended from them. BLRW genetics is a whole lot more to learn.

    Edited by staff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 22, 2013
  10. love2carve

    love2carve New Egg

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    Hi! I like the way you said you were clicking with your Buckeye baby! I have had chickens in the past but now am back into being a total chicken nut! :) I got 26 day old chicks from Meyer's Hatchery and they are wonderful! They are now 1 year and 9 months old. I got my Buckeye as a substitute in my order. I did not know what a Buckeye was. That little chick was a hoot from day 2! She was the littlest chick of the bunch and I called her PeeWee. She was so sweet and nosy! I wish I had gotten several more but I did not know at the time anything about them. Now she is the same size as most of the other girls in the group. ( assorted heritage type layers) not as big as the rocks etc. just a nice size laying hen. She is one of my most precious and favorite girls. She is the first to come up for a sample of whatever I bring to them. She is not flighty at all. She lays light tan or sort of tinted eggs, bigger than medium but not really what I would call "large" eggs. but a steady layer. She is nice to the other hens too. I wish I had 5 or 6 more of them! I cannot give in to the "chicken math" because I don't have room!

    Good luck with your chickies!
     
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