The Buckeye Thread

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Happy Chooks, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. Minniechickmama

    Minniechickmama Senora Pollo Loco

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    BLRWs are not as much about the shade of the blue but the lacing, when it comes to color. The big problem with them at this point, what I am told by a long-time Wyandotte breeder (over 30 years) says they just aren't consistently meeting the size. I am not terribly impressed so far with the size of the birds. I do have some that come down from the Foley line, but twice or more removed from a breeder doesn't seem quite right to label them to me. I have heard that Foley's birds are breeding up to standard size, which is why I got these ones. I do have one very promising cockerel who is putting on some good size as well and looking very typey and has excellent color. If that continues into maturity is yet to be seen .
    Good luck with them, they are beautiful even if they are just for laying eggs in a backyard flock. I enjoy them and most people getting a mixed flock from me like seeing them with the mixes I give them.

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  2. Blueface

    Blueface Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Size of the comb here is somewhat subjective.

    I have not seen that combs generally are the big problem when it comes to Buckeyes. I suspect what Wynette says about different climates making combs larger or smaller would apply to the Buckeye's comb as well. I do not understand why it wouldn't. I am not at the point where I am selecting just on the basis of a comb, but I have only been breeding Buckeyes for 7 years.

    IMHO, the problem I see with some Buckeyes that is not as easy to fix is in the bodies of some present lines.


    Yes, comb sizes can be very subjective like anything else with the buckeye. However, I disagree that there is not a problem with many of the combs! Creating the ideal pea comb with any consistency has proven a challenged based on many of the birds I have observed.

    For those utilizing their buckeyes for utility or a barnyard bird, I can see why the "appropriate" color might not mean all that much; the way a bird carries itself, holds its tail, walks, talks...... As long as they have that big body and wide chest....to make the chicken and dumplings or tasty chicken dishes; that's all that really matters. But for the preservationist; one who reads back through the recorded history and feels what was important to the creator and her views on color are very much different than the backyard enthusiast who loves a fresh chicken noodle soup. The two concepts of type and color go hand in hand. I get a real kick out of the constant phrases like type is the most important; it's 60%?!?!? It's true; the type establishes a breed but what's often lost is the other 40%, not to mention many of the aspects within that 60% that are not given the credit they deserve. A big wide chest is not the whole 60%! There is much more to it.
    So let's go back to the newbie; a newbie sees that big ol' stripped body and they think "I want that"......ok. They go to Throckmorten down the road with a strong backyard type flock and get their start as chicks. They raise then up; hopefully with the best of care and they go to a poultry show with these " big" bodied birds and get beat by a darker bird which is as the creator described but guess what; the darker bird had that same big ol' body and now they think back at this kind a jargon and then feel something was wrong. I find this very troubling. You see, I raise those beautiful dark colored birds and I have big ol' bodies to go along with that color. There is a clear difference between getting best of breed and winning the class! A big ol' body will only get you so far; but that other 40% actually does matter in places outside chicken noodle soup!

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    Last edited: Nov 22, 2013
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  3. homeworkin

    homeworkin Out Of The Brooder

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    One reason I bought this BLRW quad was their size. I have not weighed them yet but they are big birds with some serious heft. The cockerel is still smaller but coming along nicely.
     
  4. slfarms

    slfarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, comb sizes can be very subjective like anything else with the buckeye. However, I disagree that there is not a problem with many of the combs! Creating the ideal pea comb with any consistency has proven a challenged based on many of the birds I have observed.


    Thank you for answering about the combs and clarifying the need to follow the makers design for the breed. I'm following that breeding plan as well and finding you can have the dark red bird with type as Nettie dreamed.

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  5. AinaWGSD

    AinaWGSD Chillin' With My Peeps

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    None of my buckeyes are particularly "friendly" in the wanting to be touched kind of way. Mostly because I just don't have time to cuddle them once they reach the wack-a-doodle adolescent phase (though my 4 year old is all to happy to help me cuddle them as chicks!) But they are, as you said, the first to come see what goodies we're passing out. We pull up and the whole flock comes running to the fence and follows us as we get out and walk to the gate. Makes me smile every time[​IMG] My uncles, who raised white rocks in their youth for 4H, have mentioned several times that they've never seen chickens follow people at the fence line like that before!

    I agree, my buckeyes' eggs are not as impressive as my hatchery layer's eggs. But they're bigger than medium for sure (most of the time). We had one slightly odd looking egg, very much on the small side, in the nest box today. My husband thinks we may have a new pullet (one of the girls from our Mother's Day hatch) laying! Personally I think it's one of the older pullets, as the younger ones are still about a month shy of when the first hatch started laying.
     
  6. Minniechickmama

    Minniechickmama Senora Pollo Loco

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    Do you have an SOP to check weights against for them? I haven't weighed them out, I just have been going my comparison and feel. I am hoping to get out with my scales in the next week or so and start checking weights on more of them to be sure. I have seen some photos of beautiful BLRWs that look like they should have the size, but you never really know from pictures.
     
  7. homeworkin

    homeworkin Out Of The Brooder

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    Getting the SOP is on my to do list. All I know is the rooster and two of the hens are heavier than any other breed I have at the moment. One of the hens is scrawny. They are super fluffy, definitely can be misleading. I culled one of their cockerels a few weeks ago for having a narrow body. He was all fluff. Dressed out at barely 4# at 26 weeks. These guys are much meatier. My processor is always telling me to stick to Cornish X because of skinny birds like that one. But he tasted so good. We had chicken and rice made from a couple of scrawny 3 year old hens I bought for summer eggs til the pullets started laying. Together they barely made 5# and they took hours to cook. But, oh, the flavor!
     
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  8. HappyBuckeye

    HappyBuckeye Out Of The Brooder

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  9. HappyBuckeye

    HappyBuckeye Out Of The Brooder

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    I find that too. My Buckeyes are heavier than any other breed I have. When I pick one of them up and hand them to someone to hold, they are usually surprised by the weight.
     
  10. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    This is an excellent question and - believe it or now - it CAN be discussed without finger pointing and naming names. [​IMG] I was watching this thread last night, and got to thinking about the comparisons being made as far as a utility flock and an exhibition flock. Neither are right or wrong. The breeder needs to determine what his/her goals are. These discussions happen in each & every critter shown. I have history with horses; I've had them many, many years. We have many Amish in our state; everyone has seen (in person or in pictures) how the Amish use draft horses to plow the land, pull wagons, and for other general farm duties. We're also all very familiar with Thorobreds and the fact that they're bred to run fast - real fast. Would a T-bred be able to pull a plow? HECK NO! Nor could a draft horse run a mile. Well, he could, but not fast. The thing is, neither is "the right way" to breed a horse or "the wrong way" - each has its purpose. My point: live & let live. Decide what you want to breed for, and then go for it!
     
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