The Legbar Thread!

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by jeremy, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. summerb123

    summerb123 Crowing

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  2. amanda1

    amanda1 Songster

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    I stumbled across this post and wanted to update anyone who was interested. My CL died in March. I had a necropsy done and she had an enlarged oviduct, was an internal layer and her insides including lung area were full of yolks. She also had an enlarged liver as well as a disease where their bones grow too thick. I actually ran into someone who got a CL from the same batch and hers died in less than one year. I don’t blame the breeder, but want to warn people that the vet believes bad breeding could be part of the cause of her problems. Just do your research before buying.
     
  3. amanda1

    amanda1 Songster

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    The necropsy determined she did not have mycoplasma, but her issues were due to problems with her oviduct and being an internal layer.
     
  4. HaplessRunner

    HaplessRunner Songster

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    Entries to Date for Fourth Annual Cream Legbar Club Online, Virtual Show

    As of December 6, 2018:

    Cream Legbars: 14 cockerels and 14 pullets
    Golden Crele Legbars: 1 cock, 3 cockerels, and 2 pullets
    White Legbars: 1 cockerel and 1 pullet

    Your hens and cocks should be coming out of their annual molts and growing new feathers for the winter. Please get your pictures taken! The online show is open until December 22, 2018.

    Happy Holidays to all from the Cream Legbar Club! [​IMG]:)
     
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  5. Shannonw1228

    Shannonw1228 Songster

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    What age do legbar get the crest if they are going to?
     
  6. HaplessRunner

    HaplessRunner Songster

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    You can see the start of crests on the pullets within 3 weeks of hatching. THe males take a little longer to discern.
     
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  7. Shannonw1228

    Shannonw1228 Songster

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    OK thank you!!!
     
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  8. WVduckchick

    WVduckchick For The Birds!

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    I had 4 cream legbars hatch this weekend. One definite pullet, the other 3 look like boys. :hit
    Can anyone give me any hope of 2 pairs?
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  9. Jessi81

    Jessi81 In the Brooder

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    Hello, I am looking into getting a cream legbar rooster and am wondering about temperament. I have a small child and have all ready had toget rid of an aggressive rooster. Does anyone have any input on this?
     
  10. GaryDean26

    GaryDean26 Chicken Czar

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    All breeds of chickens can be aggressive.

    About 8 years ago I got some basque hens and everything I had read about them listed them as the friendly breed of chickens in the world. The first year I got two cockerels and one of them was the meanest cockerel I have worked with to date. I really wanted two cockerels to start my flock with but culled the mean one because his temperament was not what we wanted for the breed.

    At the same time, we got some self Blue Breda Gueldre. That was about the time the movie Avatar came out and the hatchery that we offering them compared the Breda Fowl to Avatar and painted them as a fierce warrior type breed. We did NOT get fierce birds. They were the most gentle and easy to work with birds we have seen. We could run multiple cockerels in a flock with no problem with them fighting, they didn't run from us when we needed to catch them to trim toenails, vaccinate, worm, etc.

    So...trying to stereotype chickens into one thing or another is not that helpful. Chickens are individuals and the way they interact with you has a lot to do with the way you interact with them. If you give them sufficient space and tame them up by taking them treats every time you make a trip to the coop, they will come running to you every time they see you and jump up in your lap and eat out of your hand. If they do not have adequate space and feel threatened and traped every time you open the coop door they are going to go crazy and flap away every time they see you. If they can't get away because they don't have enough space they are going to peck at you or flog you.

    Temperament is more an individual thing than it is a breed thing but it does tend to pass from generation to generation to where if you breed a mean hen to a mean cockerel you are likely to have most of the offspring to take after their parents. Likewise, if you breed a sweet cockerel to a friendly hen most of the offspring also will tend to take after the parents.

    If temperament is something that is important to you then you would best off to get your legbars from a breeder that works with small flocks and has a lot of interaction and handling of the birds. If they are treating them like pets and culling mean birds their legbars will probably be really gentle and well mannered. Hatcheries tend to just flock mate which means putting a few hundred birds in a single flock. They don't know who is mean and who is sweet and offspring from those type of flocks tend to be on the more aggressive side than a heritage bred family flock's offspring would be.

    I personally had aggressive birds in my first with legbars but after I culled all the aggressive birds from the first year and made sure to not keep any of the offspring that were aggressive the flock tamed right up. I don't think I have seen an aggressive legbar only my property for 4-5 years now. Our 4 year old can collect eggs, catch the hens, pick up the hens and carry them around like a kitten, etc and we have no problem with our cockerels (or hens). Temperament is not a breed thing and it comes down to how the flock is breed and the individual bird. The legbar breed as a whole is mostly bred in small backyard flocks and is very gentle. It is best to visit the breeder and she how they manage their flock to make sure you aren't getting stock from agressive parent stock.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019

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