The Old Folks Home

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by Wisher1000, Jul 28, 2012.

  1. dsqard

    dsqard Crazy "L" Farms

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    tcmstalcup I am in complete agreement with SCG. What I do to dispatch them is hang them upside down and then cut the jugular. They will flap and swing about but at least you are not getting beaten up. You will need a bigger scalding pot for them (pretty obvious) but other than that it is just like processing a chicken. I find turkeys easier actually because it is easier to get my hands inside the bird to get the guts out. The last one I processed (last Friday) was interesting. It was a mature hen and she had developing eggs in her and an unlaid complete egg. I've never processed a mature hen before. It was very interesting. She was also delicious after brining for a day and then smoking her. Yummy Easter dinner. [​IMG]
    ChickenCanoe we got two contractors out yesterday and SURPRISE both of them said that the original roof was installed wrong. It is just so frustrating that my small plastic chicken coop roof (installed by me who knows next to nothing about building things) stayed in place and this metal roof just peeled off. Oh well, hopefully we will be able to get the contractor moving on getting the roof installed in the next few days. At least the insurance company has been fairly easy to deal with so far.
    LFchixranch, I agree with SCG, your buddy would have tasted great even if he was small. I processed a troublesome roo about a year ago and we had "Randy" enchiladas for dinner. SCG just happened to be visiting when we ate him. She can attest that the enchiladas were even better with "Randy" in them. LOL
     
  2. Dragonfly216

    Dragonfly216 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh man, the duck under the broody is way too hilarious! May I have your permission to share that photo on my Facebook? That's too cute!
     
  3. Dragonfly216

    Dragonfly216 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lol! That's awesome.
     
  4. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    Chicken Canoe, Boy, could we use you around here.!! You must be a' jack of all trades.' What a treasure !![​IMG]
     
  5. Pozees

    Pozees Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Diva I was thinking the same thing! That roof project sounds massive!
     
  6. Highcotton

    Highcotton Southern Chickens

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    My remark was made in fun. So I am not offended. I also hope the author wasn't offended either.
     
  7. Highcotton

    Highcotton Southern Chickens

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    Thanks for being a good sport.
     
  8. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe True BYC Addict

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    Jack of all trades and master of none is what my mom used to call people like me. Meaning it takes me a lot longer to do things than a tradesman in that field (however I was an industrial electrician for about 20 years). But I can do just about anything on a building or machine - industrial, commercial and residential.
    By the time one gets to be an old folk, IMO there's not much you can't do. About all I won't do is HVAC. I'm not fond of working on appliances either (stoves/ovens are ok)
    I think that when you grow up on a farm or take on a historic home, you just automatically acquire skills repairing machinery, earth moving, rehabbing/restoring buildings etc.. Probably like Canuckbok and hubby.
    I never hired a contractor to work on this house because I didn't want to spend a lot of money and then be disappointed in the outcome.
    What can I do besides fruit and vegetable gardening, cattle, hogs, horses, chickens, game birds and large parrots?
    Rough and finish carpentry; car repair (my son and I completely rebuilt the under carriage, suspension and drive train of his '85 BMW 5-series. Over 40 years ago I did a ground up restoration of a basket case '60 Austin Healy Bugeye Sprite); drove a wrecker in my first couple jobs (75% of my adult jobs were repairing, towing and building automobiles or repairing the equipment that built cars); My first 4 years at Ford, I installed roughly 3000 vinyl roofs each week on Mercury Grand Marquis (one every minute, 10 hours a day, 6 days a week). I can pull, glue and trim out a vinyl roof on a refit in about 10 minutes. I've replaced rag tops on everything from VWs to MGs, Saabs and even a 1950 Dodge Wayfarer Sportabout.
    I wire and stick welding (I once temporarily tack welded my muffler back onto my MG on the Great River Road in Minnesota when it came apart using my car battery); operate forklifts, bulldozers and backhoes; pour, resurface and refinish concrete, lay brick and stone (I had to teach myself to mix mortar based on the age of the brick - modern mortar will ruin old brick walls); plumb whole houses; industrial pipefitting; program and repair robots; integrate disparate automation systems; do fiberglass work, et. al. infinitum. I couldn't afford a new bucket for my bucket truck so I rebuilt mine that was a true health hazard. When in Costa Rica, there were two properties that housed large parrots by the hundreds. They each had a water tower that they would pump into from the wells and then gravity feed the cages. One tank had a serious leak and it was costing them $500 a month in electric to keep the tank full. Maybe they would have been better off buying a new tank but their funding sources didn't subscribe to it. They had a few volunteers try several patches in the past to no avail. I drained the tank, ground away all the failed fiberglass and rebuilt the tank and it held. I was at the hardware store every day and learned the Spanish words for almost everything there.
    It bothered me that women got ripped off at car repair shops so about the time of the Sprite rebuild I held auto maintenance classes for women at my house where they brought their cars and I taught them to do their own oil changes, tune ups, belt and hose changes and simple bolt on stuff like alternators. The idea was, the more familiar they were with how cars operated and what parts were called, the less likely they were to be taken advantage of.

    What's cool about having skills is that you can see the world on a shoestring by volunteering. Most volunteers are college kids without many skills. They usually have to pay room and board as well as a fee for the privilege. There's a program called workaway where I listed my skills and had several offers to go to Europe and Africa with free room and board in exchange for my help. Usually when you're over 60 some of them don't want you but it depends on what you know.
    If I didn't have chickens now, I'd be travelling the world doing just that.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2014
  9. chickisoup

    chickisoup one Blessed chicki Premium Member

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    I'M A NEW CHICKI MOMMA!!!

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    Better pics to follow but they just arrived and I didn't want to harass them too much yet.
     
  10. Highcotton

    Highcotton Southern Chickens

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    I insisted that my daughter knew how to check the air in her tires, check the battery and check the oil level and the transmission fluid level before she got her drivers license.
     

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