Tips on training puppies to manage my flock, please...

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by RachelLeigh, Mar 2, 2015.

  1. RachelLeigh

    RachelLeigh Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a seven week old German Shepherd. I need all the tips I can get on how best to get the puppie to love to protect the chickens. I don't want to mess this up. I've got one shot to get it right. I've already let her look at them. I also put a box of chicks down by her crate so she can watch them at times. The real work begins in the Spring. I realize this could be a three year learning curve lol. Thanks!
     
  2. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In this thread, I explained how I trained my lab over time with new chicks but he was a bit older than your dog. We also had a 7yr old GS and she just never bothered the chickens outside. I never raised any chicks inside with her before she died. Good luck! Welcome to the flock![​IMG]
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/954657/my-fox-repellent-anyone-with-fowl-and-dogs-please-comment
     
  3. RachelLeigh

    RachelLeigh Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh thank you for that link. Imma go read it ;) Thanks for the welcome!
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Basic obedience is the first step for any pup:
    .......recall, IMO, is of utmost importance. If your dog won't come to you when you want it to, that dog can become out of control and could get itself into a dangerous situation. It needs to know you're number one and what you say goes, without question.

    ....respecting the leash. With good recall dogs can free run off leash, but they need to know how to be leashed because eventually they will need to be on leash to go to the vet or might in a situation where leashing is the safest for the dog.

    ...basic manners: sit, down, stay, no jumping up(unless invited)

    All these things will make life more pleasant for the dog, the owner and any other beings it is around.

    A dog only wants to please you......
    ....and if you are clear and consistent with communicating to the dog what pleases you and what doesn't.....
    everything else will go much smoother no matter what job you want to train the dog to do.

    It's probably harder for the human to be aware and consistently clear on the 'message' they are conveying to the dog...than it is for the dog to obey.
     
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  5. dan26552

    dan26552 True BYC Addict

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    :goodpost: x2
     
  6. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    x3[​IMG]And "leave it" is another important command, whether it applies to your shoes, people food or chickens!
     
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  7. dan26552

    dan26552 True BYC Addict

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    Oh yeah can't forget that one. Also "mine" is a handy commend.
     
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  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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  9. RachelLeigh

    RachelLeigh Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank much! Very helpful!
     
  10. TalkALittle

    TalkALittle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Forgive me, but what exactly do you mean by "mine"? There are many common verbal cues used in dog training but there are just as many that people assign their own meaning to.

    I knew a woman that used the cue "yuck" to mean "spit whatever you have in your mouth out". Most people would call that "drop it" or "out". I use "out" to mean "remove yourself from this space through the closest doorway".

    I'm wondering what "mine" might mean.
     

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